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Leroy Jones, Jr. is the creator of Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.

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@TechnicalJones: My New Post on @IHMagazine

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Check out my new post on
the Inside Healthcare Magazine
(@IHMagazine) Blog:

@TechnicalJones: mHealth Boom

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What does it all mean?:

Behind the mHealth, Telehealth Boom





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@TechnicalJones: mHealth Boom

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What does it all mean?:

Behind the mHealth, Telehealth Boom





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BREAK THROUGH -- TELEHEALTH AND mHEALTH

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According to research firm Frost & Sullivan, a number of barriers could slow down the momentum of Telehealth in our country, even as the demand for remote patient monitoring on mobile phones, tablets and computers grows.

The report notes that some of these barriers - archaic in practice, process and principle - are stymying the adoption of new technologies and processes that could actually lead to a reduction in the cost of providing health care and help the medical community enhance the quality of their services.

As I mentioned in earlier posts, there is a lack of standardization and regulatory policies (both domestic and global) governing the use of innovative technologies. And much of it comes down to who will pay for what.

Basically, the huge binders that all insurance companies send to doctors, hospitals, etc., have charts with codes listing services they will reimburse - something called Common Procedure Terminology (CPT) codes. Problem is, in all the books and associated systems, there are no codes assigned to telehealth or mHealth.

Add to that the need for education among patients, and the medical community in general, on the availability of secure technologies and the wait continues.

The Frost & Sullivan report noted that Robert Bosch Healthcare is stepping up to the task by introducing its Health Buddy system. The system focuses both on measuring vital signs and fostering patient self-management through questions and feedback on patient health behavior.

It connects patients in their homes to their care providers and has the ability not only to communicate historical patient information for patients with chronic conditions, but also to facilitate patient education and encourage medication and lifestyle compliance.

The company is working with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on a demonstration project that is expected to heighten awareness levels while reducing health care costs to adopters.

Inhibitors to adoption of new processes and programs abound throughout the health care ecosystem and these can cause delays in overall reform to the system.

The old adage, "out with the old in with the new," is something everyone in health care, including insurers, should follow to provide a cure for health care in our country.

Have a safe and healthy weekend.



Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


BREAK THROUGH -- TELEHEALTH AND mHEALTH

| No Comments


According to research firm Frost & Sullivan, a number of barriers could slow down the momentum of Telehealth in our country, even as the demand for remote patient monitoring on mobile phones, tablets and computers grows.

The report notes that some of these barriers - archaic in practice, process and principle - are stymying the adoption of new technologies and processes that could actually lead to a reduction in the cost of providing health care and help the medical community enhance the quality of their services.

As I mentioned in earlier posts, there is a lack of standardization and regulatory policies (both domestic and global) governing the use of innovative technologies. And much of it comes down to who will pay for what.

Basically, the huge binders that all insurance companies send to doctors, hospitals, etc., have charts with codes listing services they will reimburse - something called Common Procedure Terminology (CPT) codes. Problem is, in all the books and associated systems, there are no codes assigned to telehealth or mHealth.

Add to that the need for education among patients, and the medical community in general, on the availability of secure technologies and the wait continues.

The Frost & Sullivan report noted that Robert Bosch Healthcare is stepping up to the task by introducing its Health Buddy system. The system focuses both on measuring vital signs and fostering patient self-management through questions and feedback on patient health behavior.

It connects patients in their homes to their care providers and has the ability not only to communicate historical patient information for patients with chronic conditions, but also to facilitate patient education and encourage medication and lifestyle compliance.

The company is working with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on a demonstration project that is expected to heighten awareness levels while reducing health care costs to adopters.

Inhibitors to adoption of new processes and programs abound throughout the health care ecosystem and these can cause delays in overall reform to the system.

The old adage, "out with the old in with the new," is something everyone in health care, including insurers, should follow to provide a cure for health care in our country.

Have a safe and healthy weekend.



Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones



As the mHealth Summit in Washington DC approaches in a couple of weeks, I expect the excitement to only be outpaced by the hype that often surrounds technology shows like these.

Companies will showcase their devices and applications for monitoring patients, sending medical scans, prescribing meds, filing insurance claims and diagnosing injuries, while organizations in the health care industry continue supporting technical upgrades that can offer a high quality of service and reduce the even higher cost of providing health care.  Been there, done that.

Skepticism aside, I look forward to attending these events.  I enjoy speaking with people who work throughout the health care ecosystem because I am a firm believer that technology can, and will, provide solutions to a number of issues facing this industry - and we all know there is no shortage of issues.

All you need to do is look at the annual amount of money spent on health care to understand why something needs to be done.  According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, approximately $2.2 trillion was spent on health care in 2007.  Fast forward to 2018 and health care spending is estimated to skyrocket to $4.4 trillion.   This is assuming the current health care system remains intact.  So, in ten years, things like prescriptions, tests and insurance premiums will cost much, much more than they do today!

Health care events continue to promise, "this is the year" when some of the latest and greatest technology will finally make things better.  But alas, we've been hearing that for years.  Five to ten years ago telemedicine was prescribed as the solution to enhance the quality of services and reduce costs. Today, it is how we'll be able to do those same things telemedicine promised on a mobile phone. 

What I have noticed is that enhancements to medical technology is outpacing acceptance.  Patients, doctors, hospitals, insurance companies, and others, all need to do a better job of utilizing some of the technical instruments that are available to them.  They also need enact education programs for all these groups so they can make knowledgeable decisions on alternative ways of managing their health care. 

The lack of a basic understanding of how technology can positively impact health care -- from when a patient walks into a doctor's office, to receiving emergency treatment across the country, to eliminating the redundancy of completing the same insurance forms -- needs to be addressed.  It's one of the things I hope is recognized and addressed at the mHealth event.

It is often said that ignorance is bliss.  In the case of health care, it is curable...through technology.



Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones

Gearing Up for the mHealth Summit - Promise or Provision?

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As the mHealth Summit in Washington DC approaches in a couple of weeks, I expect the excitement to only be outpaced by the hype that often surrounds technology shows like these.

Companies will showcase their devices and applications for monitoring patients, sending medical scans, prescribing meds, filing insurance claims and diagnosing injuries, while organizations in the health care industry continue supporting technical upgrades that can offer a high quality of service and reduce the even higher cost of providing health care.  Been there, done that.

Skepticism aside, I look forward to attending these events.  I enjoy speaking with people who work throughout the health care ecosystem because I am a firm believer that technology can, and will, provide solutions to a number of issues facing this industry - and we all know there is no shortage of issues.

All you need to do is look at the annual amount of money spent on health care to understand why something needs to be done.  According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, approximately $2.2 trillion was spent on health care in 2007.  Fast forward to 2018 and health care spending is estimated to skyrocket to $4.4 trillion.   This is assuming the current health care system remains intact.  So, in ten years, things like prescriptions, tests and insurance premiums will cost much, much more than they do today!

Health care events continue to promise, "this is the year" when some of the latest and greatest technology will finally make things better.  But alas, we've been hearing that for years.  Five to ten years ago telemedicine was prescribed as the solution to enhance the quality of services and reduce costs. Today, it is how we'll be able to do those same things telemedicine promised on a mobile phone. 

What I have noticed is that enhancements to medical technology is outpacing acceptance.  Patients, doctors, hospitals, insurance companies, and others, all need to do a better job of utilizing some of the technical instruments that are available to them.  They also need enact education programs for all these groups so they can make knowledgeable decisions on alternative ways of managing their health care. 

The lack of a basic understanding of how technology can positively impact health care -- from when a patient walks into a doctor's office, to receiving emergency treatment across the country, to eliminating the redundancy of completing the same insurance forms -- needs to be addressed.  It's one of the things I hope is recognized and addressed at the mHealth event.

It is often said that ignorance is bliss.  In the case of health care, it is curable...through technology.



Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones

HEALTH TERMS - SMART SENSOR

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HEALTH TERM.jpgSmart Sensor

Definition:
A device that measures a signal or signals, processes data from the signal(s), and seamlessly integrates with wireless networks to transmit the data.

In health care, such sensors are used in real-time monitoring of a variety of parameters (movement, temperature, blood pressure, oxygen and glucose levels, heart rate, etc) and medication compliance.


Smart Sensors_Oct 2010.jpg


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HEALTH TERMS - SMART SENSOR

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HEALTH TERM.jpgSmart Sensor

Definition:
A device that measures a signal or signals, processes data from the signal(s), and seamlessly integrates with wireless networks to transmit the data.

In health care, such sensors are used in real-time monitoring of a variety of parameters (movement, temperature, blood pressure, oxygen and glucose levels, heart rate, etc) and medication compliance.


Smart Sensors_Oct 2010.jpg


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MOBILE TELEMED

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