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Leroy Jones, Jr. is the creator of Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.

February 2011 Archives

Rural Health: Telehealth & mHealth

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Rural Health: Telehealth & mHealth

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Tech Term - Perimeter Based Security

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Perimeter Based Security

Definition:
The technique of securing a network by controlling access to all entry and exit points of the network. Usually associated with firewalls and/or filters.



Perimeter Based Security_Feb 2011.gif



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Tech Term - Perimeter Based Security

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Perimeter Based Security

Definition:
The technique of securing a network by controlling access to all entry and exit points of the network. Usually associated with firewalls and/or filters.



Perimeter Based Security_Feb 2011.gif



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Health IT & Security

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HealthITSecurity_Feb 2011.jpg

Protecting both patient and provider data
will always be important!






Health IT & Security

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HealthITSecurity_Feb 2011.jpg

Protecting both patient and provider data
will always be important!






A Tale of Health IT

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Check out this article:

Health IT: A Tale of Three Watsons


HealthIT_Feb 2011.jpg

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A Tale of Health IT

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Check out this article:

Health IT: A Tale of Three Watsons


HealthIT_Feb 2011.jpg

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Heartland App for the Heart

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I guess it takes folks from the heartland
to create mobile apps for the heart! :-)

Check this out:



Heartland App for the Heart

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I guess it takes folks from the heartland
to create mobile apps for the heart! :-)

Check this out:



Tech Term - IP Splicing / Hijacking

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png

IP Splicing / Hijacking

Definition:
An action whereby an active, established, session is intercepted and co-opted by the unauthorized user.

IP splicing attacks may occur after an authentication has been made, permitting the attacker to assume the role of an already authorized user.

Primary protections against IP splicing rely on encryption at the session or network layer.



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Tech Term - IP Splicing / Hijacking

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png

IP Splicing / Hijacking

Definition:
An action whereby an active, established, session is intercepted and co-opted by the unauthorized user.

IP splicing attacks may occur after an authentication has been made, permitting the attacker to assume the role of an already authorized user.

Primary protections against IP splicing rely on encryption at the session or network layer.



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#HIMSS: ANOTHER EVENT - MORE PROMISES

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I feel like I'm stuck on writing about events - and most times it seems like déjà vu all over again!  I just finished talking about Mobile World Congress and now, another.

Really, I'm not addicted to these shows but rather intrigued at how many events take place, especially in the beginning of the year.   It's almost like a frat party - you come to mine and I'll come to yours, and we'll talk about the same things, make the same promises, yada, yada, yada.

So what is supposed to be the crème of health care shows takes place next week in Orlando.  The #HIMSS Annual Conference and Exhibition is expected to host nearly 30,000 attendees, with more than 900 exhibitors.  The conference, as with others, also offers educational sessions for attendees - some 400+ at this year's event.

And how appropriate that the show is in Orlando -- companies and people talking about the future of health care, where else, in fantasy land!  Every company exhibiting will have their big toys on hand to put their positive spin on how technology can truly reform the health care system.  I don't doubt that their solutions can and will work to drive down costs and enhance the quality of health care, but again, it's deploying and executing those solutions and educating all involved for adoption and mainstream use to take place.

It sounds like the educational sessions might actually be geared toward doing just that - educating.  Teaching those in the health care industry is a good start.  From the research I've read, I hope there are some doctors in attendance, as they are cited as the ones that need the most training, followed by nurses and then administrative staff.

Also, the conference is supposed to offer real-world success stories of using health care technology.  I find that having first hand examples of how someone is using something new, and actually gaining benefits, is the best way to educate people.  No demo, the real thing.

All that said though, I expect there to be demonstrations galore without the real life use examples.  In one of the benefits of attending the show I think I read something like, "health IT that could bring the greatest value to the greater health care community."  Could?  Let's be a bit more positive on this one team and say "can" or "will" if you're really convinced this stuff will work.  It's not like you're offering a diagnosis where you have to be sure to let patients know all the alternatives.  Guess this is what happens when you have medical folks running a conference.

Next show up is the Cellular Telecommunications & Internet Association (CTIA) event - again in Orlando.  I'm sure they'll have a medical component also, but geared more toward #mHealth, making some of the products at #HIMSS mobile.

But I promise to make that the last event I talk about this year - unless something really groundbreaking happens.

Have a safe and healthy week

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones



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#HIMSS: ANOTHER EVENT - MORE PROMISES

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I feel like I'm stuck on writing about events - and most times it seems like déjà vu all over again!  I just finished talking about Mobile World Congress and now, another.

Really, I'm not addicted to these shows but rather intrigued at how many events take place, especially in the beginning of the year.   It's almost like a frat party - you come to mine and I'll come to yours, and we'll talk about the same things, make the same promises, yada, yada, yada.

So what is supposed to be the crème of health care shows takes place next week in Orlando.  The #HIMSS Annual Conference and Exhibition is expected to host nearly 30,000 attendees, with more than 900 exhibitors.  The conference, as with others, also offers educational sessions for attendees - some 400+ at this year's event.

And how appropriate that the show is in Orlando -- companies and people talking about the future of health care, where else, in fantasy land!  Every company exhibiting will have their big toys on hand to put their positive spin on how technology can truly reform the health care system.  I don't doubt that their solutions can and will work to drive down costs and enhance the quality of health care, but again, it's deploying and executing those solutions and educating all involved for adoption and mainstream use to take place.

It sounds like the educational sessions might actually be geared toward doing just that - educating.  Teaching those in the health care industry is a good start.  From the research I've read, I hope there are some doctors in attendance, as they are cited as the ones that need the most training, followed by nurses and then administrative staff.

Also, the conference is supposed to offer real-world success stories of using health care technology.  I find that having first hand examples of how someone is using something new, and actually gaining benefits, is the best way to educate people.  No demo, the real thing.

All that said though, I expect there to be demonstrations galore without the real life use examples.  In one of the benefits of attending the show I think I read something like, "health IT that could bring the greatest value to the greater health care community."  Could?  Let's be a bit more positive on this one team and say "can" or "will" if you're really convinced this stuff will work.  It's not like you're offering a diagnosis where you have to be sure to let patients know all the alternatives.  Guess this is what happens when you have medical folks running a conference.

Next show up is the Cellular Telecommunications & Internet Association (CTIA) event - again in Orlando.  I'm sure they'll have a medical component also, but geared more toward #mHealth, making some of the products at #HIMSS mobile.

But I promise to make that the last event I talk about this year - unless something really groundbreaking happens.

Have a safe and healthy week

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones



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Phone Smart

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Phone Smart

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mHealth Sounds

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The march into the future continues . . . 



UltraSound_Feb 2011.jpg


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mHealth Sounds

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The march into the future continues . . . 



UltraSound_Feb 2011.jpg


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mHealth - A Significant Step Forward

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By now you've all read about the hundreds, or maybe even thousands, of health care applications available for smartphones, tablets, etc., but none have made as significant an impact on moving mHealth to the next level as the one given approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last week.

Last Friday's approval by the FDA of Cleveland-based MIM Software's Mobile MIM application was a landmark for mHealth. The new mobile radiology application will allow physicians to view medical images on the iPhone and iPad manufactured by Apple Inc. As with other applications, I'd think you can assume it will eventually be available for mobile devices running other operating systems.

The application is the first cleared by the FDA for viewing images and making medical diagnoses based on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and nuclear medicine technology, such as positron emission tomography (PET).

While it is not intended to replace full workstations and is indicated for use only when there is no access to a workstation, the approval to use the application is a giant leap forward - especially in rural areas where health care can be better served through telemedicine or mHealth solutions. More importantly, doctors will no longer have to wait for actual x-rays or scans to physically be delivered.

Mobile MIM initially was the first medical app in Apple's AppStore in 2008, but due to regulatory concerns had to be removed a short time later...until last week.

mHealth lives!

Really think of it. Any CT, MRI or PET images taken by a hospital or at a provider's office can be sent to the appropriate portable device after being compressed for a "secure network transfer" through the Mobile MIM software. The software allows providers to measure both distance and intensity values for the images. As mentioned in the past, security is a key component for technology adoption of health care applications and it is built into the application.

Even though it is strictly regulated, I expect the FDA to approve more applications and mobile devices for the medical industry in order to move health care reform in a positive direction.

Have a safe and healthy week


Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones




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mHealth - A Significant Step Forward

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By now you've all read about the hundreds, or maybe even thousands, of health care applications available for smartphones, tablets, etc., but none have made as significant an impact on moving mHealth to the next level as the one given approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last week.

Last Friday's approval by the FDA of Cleveland-based MIM Software's Mobile MIM application was a landmark for mHealth. The new mobile radiology application will allow physicians to view medical images on the iPhone and iPad manufactured by Apple Inc. As with other applications, I'd think you can assume it will eventually be available for mobile devices running other operating systems.

The application is the first cleared by the FDA for viewing images and making medical diagnoses based on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and nuclear medicine technology, such as positron emission tomography (PET).

While it is not intended to replace full workstations and is indicated for use only when there is no access to a workstation, the approval to use the application is a giant leap forward - especially in rural areas where health care can be better served through telemedicine or mHealth solutions. More importantly, doctors will no longer have to wait for actual x-rays or scans to physically be delivered.

Mobile MIM initially was the first medical app in Apple's AppStore in 2008, but due to regulatory concerns had to be removed a short time later...until last week.

mHealth lives!

Really think of it. Any CT, MRI or PET images taken by a hospital or at a provider's office can be sent to the appropriate portable device after being compressed for a "secure network transfer" through the Mobile MIM software. The software allows providers to measure both distance and intensity values for the images. As mentioned in the past, security is a key component for technology adoption of health care applications and it is built into the application.

Even though it is strictly regulated, I expect the FDA to approve more applications and mobile devices for the medical industry in order to move health care reform in a positive direction.

Have a safe and healthy week


Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones




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Tech Term - Web Bug

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Web Bug_Feb 2011.jpg
TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Web Bug


Definition:
  A link on a given Web page or embedded in an email message that contains a link to a different Web site and therefore passes a call, and information, unknown to the user, to a remote site.

Most commonly a web bug is either invisible or unnoticeable (typically it is one pixel in size) in order not to alert the user to its presence.



Tech Term - Web Bug

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Web Bug_Feb 2011.jpg
TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Web Bug


Definition:
  A link on a given Web page or embedded in an email message that contains a link to a different Web site and therefore passes a call, and information, unknown to the user, to a remote site.

Most commonly a web bug is either invisible or unnoticeable (typically it is one pixel in size) in order not to alert the user to its presence.



mHealth Study: GWU & Phone Pill

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mHealth Study: GWU & Phone Pill

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mHealth Africa

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mHealth Africa

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mHealth Money

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mHealth Money

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The First

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The First

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Tech Terms - Automated Security Monitoring

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TechTerm.png
Automated Security Monitoring

Definition
: All security features needed to provide an acceptable level of protection for hardware, software, and classified, sensitive, unclassified or critical data, material, or processes in the system.



Auto Security Monitoring_Feb 2011.jpg



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Tech Terms - Automated Security Monitoring

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TechTerm.png
Automated Security Monitoring

Definition
: All security features needed to provide an acceptable level of protection for hardware, software, and classified, sensitive, unclassified or critical data, material, or processes in the system.



Auto Security Monitoring_Feb 2011.jpg



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Tech Term - Traceroute

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Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.pngTraceroute

Definition:
An operation of sending trace packets for determining information; traces the route of UDP packets for the local host to a remote host.

Normally traceroute displays the time and location of the route taken to reach its destination computer.

Traceroute_Feb 2011.gif


Tech Term - Traceroute

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Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.pngTraceroute

Definition:
An operation of sending trace packets for determining information; traces the route of UDP packets for the local host to a remote host.

Normally traceroute displays the time and location of the route taken to reach its destination computer.

Traceroute_Feb 2011.gif


MOBILE WORLD CONGRESS & mHEALTH

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According to its online website, the GSM Association (GSMA) notes, "The incredible advancement of mobile communications has created an opportunity to revolutionise the health care industry. From tools that promote healthy lifestyles to remotely monitoring disease outbreaks, the future of worldwide health clearly lies in mobile technology."

The upcoming Global Mobile World Congress Conference in Barcelona, Spain, is perhaps the largest event focused on utilizing mobile communications in our personal and professional lives, putting the power of technology in the palm of our hands.

Most companies attending the event use it to announce their new products and services as well as offering glimpses of future mobile technologies that will come to market over the next couple of years.

That said, it's no wonder that this year's conference has a track dedicated to mHealth - what I would consider the next evolutionary step beyond telehealth.

The conference offers exhibitors the opportunity to show what they can do for businesses to support the medical community, as well as the services those businesses can provide to patients, doctors, therapists and others.

But as I pointed out in the past, mobile technologies - networks, applications, services and devices - are moving much faster than the health care infrastructure and government policies required to utilize these advanced tools so expect adoption to take some time.

GSMA will offer several panels that address some of the main issues and opportunities associated with mHealth, including how and when can mHealth become a profitable business, remote monitoring and preventive care, and of course, a glimpse into the future business and technology of mHealth. It wouldn't be a technical event if we didn't see the Star Trek devices.

With the rash of mobile operators throughout the world jumping on the mHealth bandwagon, the number of companies offering wellness and health care solutions is likely to increase.

Mobile operators enable the connectivity required for the applications and services whether in the home, around the corner, across the country, or in another part of the world. GSMA is likely to become a global advocate for moving mHealth forward in a world gone mobile.

I often talk about the cost of health care in the United States but the same is true around the world. The health care value chain that warrants fixing domestically needs similar treatment in other countries struggling to reform their systems.

The membership and reach of GSMA, along with its technology standards bodies, should play an important role in formalizing the best way to enliven mHealth regardless of where one lives, works or plays.

In the mobile industry, mHealth is viewed as a growth market - which translates to, "there's potential for a lot of money to be made in supporting health care." The carrot is being dangled in front of them. Now let's see what these folks can do to drive this technology and its benefits forward.


Have a safe and healthy week.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


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MOBILE WORLD CONGRESS & mHEALTH

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According to its online website, the GSM Association (GSMA) notes, "The incredible advancement of mobile communications has created an opportunity to revolutionise the health care industry. From tools that promote healthy lifestyles to remotely monitoring disease outbreaks, the future of worldwide health clearly lies in mobile technology."

The upcoming Global Mobile World Congress Conference in Barcelona, Spain, is perhaps the largest event focused on utilizing mobile communications in our personal and professional lives, putting the power of technology in the palm of our hands.

Most companies attending the event use it to announce their new products and services as well as offering glimpses of future mobile technologies that will come to market over the next couple of years.

That said, it's no wonder that this year's conference has a track dedicated to mHealth - what I would consider the next evolutionary step beyond telehealth.

The conference offers exhibitors the opportunity to show what they can do for businesses to support the medical community, as well as the services those businesses can provide to patients, doctors, therapists and others.

But as I pointed out in the past, mobile technologies - networks, applications, services and devices - are moving much faster than the health care infrastructure and government policies required to utilize these advanced tools so expect adoption to take some time.

GSMA will offer several panels that address some of the main issues and opportunities associated with mHealth, including how and when can mHealth become a profitable business, remote monitoring and preventive care, and of course, a glimpse into the future business and technology of mHealth. It wouldn't be a technical event if we didn't see the Star Trek devices.

With the rash of mobile operators throughout the world jumping on the mHealth bandwagon, the number of companies offering wellness and health care solutions is likely to increase.

Mobile operators enable the connectivity required for the applications and services whether in the home, around the corner, across the country, or in another part of the world. GSMA is likely to become a global advocate for moving mHealth forward in a world gone mobile.

I often talk about the cost of health care in the United States but the same is true around the world. The health care value chain that warrants fixing domestically needs similar treatment in other countries struggling to reform their systems.

The membership and reach of GSMA, along with its technology standards bodies, should play an important role in formalizing the best way to enliven mHealth regardless of where one lives, works or plays.

In the mobile industry, mHealth is viewed as a growth market - which translates to, "there's potential for a lot of money to be made in supporting health care." The carrot is being dangled in front of them. Now let's see what these folks can do to drive this technology and its benefits forward.


Have a safe and healthy week.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


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Tech Term - Trusted Computing Base

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Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Trusted Computing Base (TCB)

Definition:
  The totality of protection mechanisms within a computer system including hardware, firmware, and software - the combination of which are responsible for enforcing a security policy.

A TCB consists of one or more components that together enforce a unified security policy over a product or system.



TCB_Feb 2011.png


Tech Term - Trusted Computing Base

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Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Trusted Computing Base (TCB)

Definition:
  The totality of protection mechanisms within a computer system including hardware, firmware, and software - the combination of which are responsible for enforcing a security policy.

A TCB consists of one or more components that together enforce a unified security policy over a product or system.



TCB_Feb 2011.png


Health IT Survey

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Health IT Survey

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