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Leroy Jones, Jr. is the creator of Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.

January 2011 Archives

Healthcare Applications Will Continue Growing

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The introduction of the iPhone brought about a significant change in the way people used their mobile phones - probably because it was the first device of its kind to actually put the Internet into your hand. While many other devices tried to deliver what the iPhone did, none could.

But now, a new generation of smartphones running operating systems similar to those in computers, promise a whole new generation of applications for those of us who want to get tips and take better care of ourselves on a daily basis.

According to the Global Mobile Health Market Report 2010-2015 compiled by research2guidance, more than a third of 1.4 billion smartphone users in 2015 will be running some kind of mobile health care application. I take that to mean all health care apps, including wellness apps.

I know there will be folks who disagree with my perspective on this, but I put health care and wellness into two categories.

Health care is something that is essential for you, normally with an associated cost and some interaction with a licensed physician. Wellness, on the other hand, is advice and counsel on keeping yourself fit and healthy, doesn't come with a price tag (except what you have to pay to download an application) and can be something that a friend told you about.

So doing things like exercising, getting a good night's sleep, steering clear of substance abuse of all kinds, maintaining a reasonable diet can all help in our personalized wellness campaigns. And as they say, "there's an app for that."

For healthcare, it's more than just apps when talking about mHealth. Consumer health electronics devices like portable ECG machines, blood pressure monitors and weight scales seamlessly capture and transmit patient information from home, work or from the road. These devices and applications can be more of a "must" for patients rather than something that is simply nice to have.

I believe wellness applications will be the frontrunner in achieving the numbers in the report mentioned above.

There are already more than 17,000 health care applications that can be downloaded free or at a minimal cost for iOS, Android, WindowsMobile, Blackberry and other mobile operating systems. More than half of these are wellness apps with that number continuing to grow as the market for mHealth ramps up.

As the year goes on I plan on dedicating some of these blogs to highlight the various healthcare and wellness applications available for personal and/or professional use.

Have a safe and healthy week.


Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


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Healthcare Applications Will Continue Growing

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The introduction of the iPhone brought about a significant change in the way people used their mobile phones - probably because it was the first device of its kind to actually put the Internet into your hand. While many other devices tried to deliver what the iPhone did, none could.

But now, a new generation of smartphones running operating systems similar to those in computers, promise a whole new generation of applications for those of us who want to get tips and take better care of ourselves on a daily basis.

According to the Global Mobile Health Market Report 2010-2015 compiled by research2guidance, more than a third of 1.4 billion smartphone users in 2015 will be running some kind of mobile health care application. I take that to mean all health care apps, including wellness apps.

I know there will be folks who disagree with my perspective on this, but I put health care and wellness into two categories.

Health care is something that is essential for you, normally with an associated cost and some interaction with a licensed physician. Wellness, on the other hand, is advice and counsel on keeping yourself fit and healthy, doesn't come with a price tag (except what you have to pay to download an application) and can be something that a friend told you about.

So doing things like exercising, getting a good night's sleep, steering clear of substance abuse of all kinds, maintaining a reasonable diet can all help in our personalized wellness campaigns. And as they say, "there's an app for that."

For healthcare, it's more than just apps when talking about mHealth. Consumer health electronics devices like portable ECG machines, blood pressure monitors and weight scales seamlessly capture and transmit patient information from home, work or from the road. These devices and applications can be more of a "must" for patients rather than something that is simply nice to have.

I believe wellness applications will be the frontrunner in achieving the numbers in the report mentioned above.

There are already more than 17,000 health care applications that can be downloaded free or at a minimal cost for iOS, Android, WindowsMobile, Blackberry and other mobile operating systems. More than half of these are wellness apps with that number continuing to grow as the market for mHealth ramps up.

As the year goes on I plan on dedicating some of these blogs to highlight the various healthcare and wellness applications available for personal and/or professional use.

Have a safe and healthy week.


Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


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Tech Term - Security Incident

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TechTerm.png
Security Incident

Definition:
Any act or circumstance that involves classified information that deviates from the requirements of governing security publications.

For example, compromise, possible compromise, inadvertent disclosure, and deviation.



Security Incident_Jan 2011.jpg



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Tech Term - Security Incident

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TechTerm.png
Security Incident

Definition:
Any act or circumstance that involves classified information that deviates from the requirements of governing security publications.

For example, compromise, possible compromise, inadvertent disclosure, and deviation.



Security Incident_Jan 2011.jpg



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Tech Term - JPEG

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG)

Definition:
An ISO/ITU standard for compressing still images. Pronounced "jay-peg," the JPEG format is very popular due to its variable compression range.

JPEGs are saved on a sliding resolution scale based on the quality desired. For example, an image can be saved in high quality for photo printing, in medium quality for the Web and in low quality for attaching to e-mails, the latter providing the smallest file size for fastest transmission over dial-up connections.

Not Great for Text

JPEGs are not suitable for graphs, charts and explanatory illustrations because the text appears fuzzy, especially at low resolutions.

Compressing images in the GIF format is much better for such material.

JPEGs Are Lossy
Using discrete cosine transform, JPEG is a lossy compression method, wherein some data from the original image is lost. It depends on the image, but ratios of 10:1 to 20:1 may provide little noticeable loss.

The more the loss can be tolerated, the more the image can be compressed.

Compression is achieved by dividing the picture into tiny pixel blocks, which are halved over and over until the desired amount of compression is achieved.

JPEGs can be created in software or hardware, the latter providing sufficient speed for real-time, on-the-fly compression. C-Cube Microsystems introduced the first JPEG chip.

File Extensions
JPEGs use the JPEG File Interchange Format (JFIF), and file extensions are .JPG or .JFF. M-JPEG and MPEG are variations of JPEG used for full-motion digital video.


JPEG_Jan 2011.png


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Tech Term - JPEG

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG)

Definition:
An ISO/ITU standard for compressing still images. Pronounced "jay-peg," the JPEG format is very popular due to its variable compression range.

JPEGs are saved on a sliding resolution scale based on the quality desired. For example, an image can be saved in high quality for photo printing, in medium quality for the Web and in low quality for attaching to e-mails, the latter providing the smallest file size for fastest transmission over dial-up connections.

Not Great for Text

JPEGs are not suitable for graphs, charts and explanatory illustrations because the text appears fuzzy, especially at low resolutions.

Compressing images in the GIF format is much better for such material.

JPEGs Are Lossy
Using discrete cosine transform, JPEG is a lossy compression method, wherein some data from the original image is lost. It depends on the image, but ratios of 10:1 to 20:1 may provide little noticeable loss.

The more the loss can be tolerated, the more the image can be compressed.

Compression is achieved by dividing the picture into tiny pixel blocks, which are halved over and over until the desired amount of compression is achieved.

JPEGs can be created in software or hardware, the latter providing sufficient speed for real-time, on-the-fly compression. C-Cube Microsystems introduced the first JPEG chip.

File Extensions
JPEGs use the JPEG File Interchange Format (JFIF), and file extensions are .JPG or .JFF. M-JPEG and MPEG are variations of JPEG used for full-motion digital video.


JPEG_Jan 2011.png


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Health Robotics

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Health Robotics

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Tech Term - Non-Repudiation

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TechTerm.png
Non-Repudiation

Definition:
  Method by which the sender of data is provided with proof of delivery and the recipient is assured of the sender's identity, so that neither can later deny having processed the data.




Non-Repudiation_Jan 2011.jpg

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Tech Term - Non-Repudiation

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TechTerm.png
Non-Repudiation

Definition:
  Method by which the sender of data is provided with proof of delivery and the recipient is assured of the sender's identity, so that neither can later deny having processed the data.




Non-Repudiation_Jan 2011.jpg

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BREAK THROUGH -- TELEHEALTH AND mHEALTH

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According to research firm Frost & Sullivan, a number of barriers could slow down the momentum of Telehealth in our country, even as the demand for remote patient monitoring on mobile phones, tablets and computers grows.

The report notes that some of these barriers - archaic in practice, process and principle - are stymying the adoption of new technologies and processes that could actually lead to a reduction in the cost of providing health care and help the medical community enhance the quality of their services.

As I mentioned in earlier posts, there is a lack of standardization and regulatory policies (both domestic and global) governing the use of innovative technologies. And much of it comes down to who will pay for what.

Basically, the huge binders that all insurance companies send to doctors, hospitals, etc., have charts with codes listing services they will reimburse - something called Common Procedure Terminology (CPT) codes. Problem is, in all the books and associated systems, there are no codes assigned to telehealth or mHealth.

Add to that the need for education among patients, and the medical community in general, on the availability of secure technologies and the wait continues.

The Frost & Sullivan report noted that Robert Bosch Healthcare is stepping up to the task by introducing its Health Buddy system. The system focuses both on measuring vital signs and fostering patient self-management through questions and feedback on patient health behavior.

It connects patients in their homes to their care providers and has the ability not only to communicate historical patient information for patients with chronic conditions, but also to facilitate patient education and encourage medication and lifestyle compliance.

The company is working with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on a demonstration project that is expected to heighten awareness levels while reducing health care costs to adopters.

Inhibitors to adoption of new processes and programs abound throughout the health care ecosystem and these can cause delays in overall reform to the system.

The old adage, "out with the old in with the new," is something everyone in health care, including insurers, should follow to provide a cure for health care in our country.

Have a safe and healthy weekend.



Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


BREAK THROUGH -- TELEHEALTH AND mHEALTH

| No Comments


According to research firm Frost & Sullivan, a number of barriers could slow down the momentum of Telehealth in our country, even as the demand for remote patient monitoring on mobile phones, tablets and computers grows.

The report notes that some of these barriers - archaic in practice, process and principle - are stymying the adoption of new technologies and processes that could actually lead to a reduction in the cost of providing health care and help the medical community enhance the quality of their services.

As I mentioned in earlier posts, there is a lack of standardization and regulatory policies (both domestic and global) governing the use of innovative technologies. And much of it comes down to who will pay for what.

Basically, the huge binders that all insurance companies send to doctors, hospitals, etc., have charts with codes listing services they will reimburse - something called Common Procedure Terminology (CPT) codes. Problem is, in all the books and associated systems, there are no codes assigned to telehealth or mHealth.

Add to that the need for education among patients, and the medical community in general, on the availability of secure technologies and the wait continues.

The Frost & Sullivan report noted that Robert Bosch Healthcare is stepping up to the task by introducing its Health Buddy system. The system focuses both on measuring vital signs and fostering patient self-management through questions and feedback on patient health behavior.

It connects patients in their homes to their care providers and has the ability not only to communicate historical patient information for patients with chronic conditions, but also to facilitate patient education and encourage medication and lifestyle compliance.

The company is working with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on a demonstration project that is expected to heighten awareness levels while reducing health care costs to adopters.

Inhibitors to adoption of new processes and programs abound throughout the health care ecosystem and these can cause delays in overall reform to the system.

The old adage, "out with the old in with the new," is something everyone in health care, including insurers, should follow to provide a cure for health care in our country.

Have a safe and healthy weekend.



Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


Health Term - Current Procedural Terminology

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Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for HealthCareTerm.jpg
CPT (Current Procedural Terminology)

Definition:
Are code numbers assigned to every task and service a medical practitioner may provide to a patient including medical, surgical and diagnostic services.

They are then used by insurers to determine the amount of reimbursement that a practitioner will receive by an insurer. Since everyone uses the same codes to mean the same thing, they ensure uniformity.



CPT_Jan 2011.jpg


Health Term - Current Procedural Terminology

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Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for HealthCareTerm.jpg
CPT (Current Procedural Terminology)

Definition:
Are code numbers assigned to every task and service a medical practitioner may provide to a patient including medical, surgical and diagnostic services.

They are then used by insurers to determine the amount of reimbursement that a practitioner will receive by an insurer. Since everyone uses the same codes to mean the same thing, they ensure uniformity.



CPT_Jan 2011.jpg


USB Hack

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USB Hack

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Tech Term - Operational Data Security

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Operational Data Security

Definition:
The protection of data from either accidental or unauthorized, intentional modification, destruction, or disclosure during input, processing, or output operations.



Operational Data Security_Jan 2011.jpg



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Tech Term - Operational Data Security

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Operational Data Security

Definition:
The protection of data from either accidental or unauthorized, intentional modification, destruction, or disclosure during input, processing, or output operations.



Operational Data Security_Jan 2011.jpg



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Dr. King

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Dr. King

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Tablets: More than just medication

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If you had the opportunity to join the 140,000 or so attendees at this year's Consumer Electronics Show, you learned quickly that the prescription for "cool" this year will be tablets - not the multi-vitamins you take, but the smallest of computers expected to come onto the market this year.

Along with tablets, came phones, phones and more phones. Smartphones that work on 3G and 4G networks, that run on all wireless technologies, with operating systems from Apple, Microsoft, Blackberry and others.

Motorola even showcased a smartphone that doubles as a laptop or tablet, simply by dropping it into a docking station connected to a screen and keyboard.  The Atrix is the first true morphing of a mobile phone and computer - and gave attendees a view of the shape of things to come. Simply put, the Atrix can be the next game-changer - sort of like the iPhone when first introduced.

Health care also offered some very cool devices, some honored with CES Awards in the Health and Wellness category. Exhibitors of all sizes showed up.

From smaller companies like Dakim that helps seniors use rigorous cognitive exercise to prevent or slow the development of dementia to Intel and its Health Care Management Suite, that offers health care professionals the ability to review their patients' progress and data quickly and simply. It even can arrange and conduct two-way video calls, allowing both patient and care manager to see and hear each other.

Seems like all the health care devices and applications exhibited at CES were directly impacted by the ability to keep connected regardless of where the patient, doctor or caregiver might be 24/7.

This is where the "rubber meets the road" as they say. Mobility is the key to the success of mHealth. It will be "the" driver of health care services in the future.

The use of tablets and smartphones - or that morphed device --in the health care industry will rise significantly in the next two years as the industry tries to adopt and keep up with innovative 21st Century technologies.

Surprisingly, about 80 percent of the tablets on display at CES could only be connected in hotspot areas served by Wi-Fi. If ubiquitous connections are required for anytime, anywhere health care - mHealth - computer companies might want to take advantage of embedding 3G and 4G connections from cellular companies into their tablets.

The one constant mobile carriers highlight about their services is coverage - speed, quality, and price are the others. But coverage is king in the mobile business. If computer companies want to help drive the evolution of mHealth they should take advantage of available chipsets from Qualcomm or Option that can power-up their tablets to work on any, or all, wireless/mobile data networks.

Not having ubiquitous connectivity in a computer is like building a car without air conditioning.

Have a safe and healthy week.


Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


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Tablets: More than just medication

| No Comments


If you had the opportunity to join the 140,000 or so attendees at this year's Consumer Electronics Show, you learned quickly that the prescription for "cool" this year will be tablets - not the multi-vitamins you take, but the smallest of computers expected to come onto the market this year.

Along with tablets, came phones, phones and more phones. Smartphones that work on 3G and 4G networks, that run on all wireless technologies, with operating systems from Apple, Microsoft, Blackberry and others.

Motorola even showcased a smartphone that doubles as a laptop or tablet, simply by dropping it into a docking station connected to a screen and keyboard.  The Atrix is the first true morphing of a mobile phone and computer - and gave attendees a view of the shape of things to come. Simply put, the Atrix can be the next game-changer - sort of like the iPhone when first introduced.

Health care also offered some very cool devices, some honored with CES Awards in the Health and Wellness category. Exhibitors of all sizes showed up.

From smaller companies like Dakim that helps seniors use rigorous cognitive exercise to prevent or slow the development of dementia to Intel and its Health Care Management Suite, that offers health care professionals the ability to review their patients' progress and data quickly and simply. It even can arrange and conduct two-way video calls, allowing both patient and care manager to see and hear each other.

Seems like all the health care devices and applications exhibited at CES were directly impacted by the ability to keep connected regardless of where the patient, doctor or caregiver might be 24/7.

This is where the "rubber meets the road" as they say. Mobility is the key to the success of mHealth. It will be "the" driver of health care services in the future.

The use of tablets and smartphones - or that morphed device --in the health care industry will rise significantly in the next two years as the industry tries to adopt and keep up with innovative 21st Century technologies.

Surprisingly, about 80 percent of the tablets on display at CES could only be connected in hotspot areas served by Wi-Fi. If ubiquitous connections are required for anytime, anywhere health care - mHealth - computer companies might want to take advantage of embedding 3G and 4G connections from cellular companies into their tablets.

The one constant mobile carriers highlight about their services is coverage - speed, quality, and price are the others. But coverage is king in the mobile business. If computer companies want to help drive the evolution of mHealth they should take advantage of available chipsets from Qualcomm or Option that can power-up their tablets to work on any, or all, wireless/mobile data networks.

Not having ubiquitous connectivity in a computer is like building a car without air conditioning.

Have a safe and healthy week.


Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


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Rural Health & Meaningful Use

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Rural Health & Meaningful Use

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Tech Term - Countermeasures

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TechTerm.png
Countermeasures

Definition:
Action, device, procedure, technique, or other measure that reduces the vulnerability of an automated information system.

Countermeasures that are aimed at specific threats and vulnerabilities involve more sophisticated techniques as well as activities traditionally perceived as security.


Countermeasures_Jan 2011.jpg


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Tech Term - Countermeasures

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TechTerm.png
Countermeasures

Definition:
Action, device, procedure, technique, or other measure that reduces the vulnerability of an automated information system.

Countermeasures that are aimed at specific threats and vulnerabilities involve more sophisticated techniques as well as activities traditionally perceived as security.


Countermeasures_Jan 2011.jpg


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Gadgets & Technology

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Gadgets & Technology

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Tablet Watch

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Tablet Watch

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Technology Offers Peace-of-Mind for Home Health Care

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With the recent "electronic" pill bottle announcement by AT&T and Vitality, health care technology is destined to move into the home - maybe right into your medicine cabinet!!!

With all the innovations being announced, one of the best ways to educate consumers about the state of health care technology is by offering enhanced services that can be used on a daily basis.

Realistically, it may be some time before anyone uses a pill bottle that notifies people when it's time to take medications by sending reminder calls, but it's this bold innovation that will ultimately contribute to the future health care system in our country. And it could be something that impacts how health care is offered in the not-to-distant future.

Home health care is a perfect area for innovation. While larger companies, including Qualcomm, IBM, GE and others focus on the big picture, and set the pace for advanced technical health care solutions, smaller companies are beginning to offer more immediate solutions for in-home care.

For example, family members would have the peace-of-mind knowing their loved ones in need of caregiving are at home instead of in hospitals, rehab centers or long-term elder care facilities.

Homecare is not only good for the family, but for the people requiring the caregiving. More often than not, the ability to receive caregiver service in the home allows them to continue interacting in their social circles - for youngsters, this would be the equivalent of social networking -- keeping their minds active and their lives independent.

Companies such as Grandcare, Healthwise and Independa, offer caregivers the ability to keep a virtual eye on elderly parents or homebound patients.

In varying degrees, these companies offer remote services that can monitor the condition of a parents' home and health status at a glance, communicate with in-home caregivers to alert them that the patient did not take their medication, or that they may have missed a doctor's appointment. Some even can remind people about local community services and activities.

As the New Year begins, health care reform continues to elude government. Many solutions for decreasing costs and enhancing services are already available, and with a glimpse of the impact technology could have, like the pill bottle, the potential future of health care could become a shining example of what can be done if we take advantage of the tools available to all of us.

Have a safe and healthy week.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones



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Technology Offers Peace-of-Mind for Home Health Care

| No Comments


With the recent "electronic" pill bottle announcement by AT&T and Vitality, health care technology is destined to move into the home - maybe right into your medicine cabinet!!!

With all the innovations being announced, one of the best ways to educate consumers about the state of health care technology is by offering enhanced services that can be used on a daily basis.

Realistically, it may be some time before anyone uses a pill bottle that notifies people when it's time to take medications by sending reminder calls, but it's this bold innovation that will ultimately contribute to the future health care system in our country. And it could be something that impacts how health care is offered in the not-to-distant future.

Home health care is a perfect area for innovation. While larger companies, including Qualcomm, IBM, GE and others focus on the big picture, and set the pace for advanced technical health care solutions, smaller companies are beginning to offer more immediate solutions for in-home care.

For example, family members would have the peace-of-mind knowing their loved ones in need of caregiving are at home instead of in hospitals, rehab centers or long-term elder care facilities.

Homecare is not only good for the family, but for the people requiring the caregiving. More often than not, the ability to receive caregiver service in the home allows them to continue interacting in their social circles - for youngsters, this would be the equivalent of social networking -- keeping their minds active and their lives independent.

Companies such as Grandcare, Healthwise and Independa, offer caregivers the ability to keep a virtual eye on elderly parents or homebound patients.

In varying degrees, these companies offer remote services that can monitor the condition of a parents' home and health status at a glance, communicate with in-home caregivers to alert them that the patient did not take their medication, or that they may have missed a doctor's appointment. Some even can remind people about local community services and activities.

As the New Year begins, health care reform continues to elude government. Many solutions for decreasing costs and enhancing services are already available, and with a glimpse of the impact technology could have, like the pill bottle, the potential future of health care could become a shining example of what can be done if we take advantage of the tools available to all of us.

Have a safe and healthy week.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones



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Tech Term - Breach

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Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.pngBreach

Definition:
The successful defeat of security controls which could result in a penetration of the system.

A violation of controls of a particular information system such that information assets or system components are unduly exposed.

Breach_Jan 2011.jpg



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Tech Term - Breach

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Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.pngBreach

Definition:
The successful defeat of security controls which could result in a penetration of the system.

A violation of controls of a particular information system such that information assets or system components are unduly exposed.

Breach_Jan 2011.jpg



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Documentary: No Drvg - No Txtg

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Watch it:




For more information on Text Messaging/SMS - Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:

TECH TERM - TEXT MESSAGING

TECH TERM - SMS

REMINDER: NO DRVG - NO TXTG

NO DRIVING - NO TEXTING




Documentary: No Drvg - No Txtg

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Watch it:




For more information on Text Messaging/SMS - Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:

TECH TERM - TEXT MESSAGING

TECH TERM - SMS

REMINDER: NO DRVG - NO TXTG

NO DRIVING - NO TEXTING




Rural Health Technology

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Rural Health Technology

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Face Money

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Face Money

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