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Author

Leroy Jones, Jr. is the creator of Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.

December 2010 Archives

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

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Happy New Year_Dec 2010.jpg
HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!




HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

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Happy New Year_Dec 2010.jpg
HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!




New Year's Resolutions

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It's that time of the year again when we all make promises that we won't keep - okay, so maybe we keep a few. But for the most part we overstretch (and I don't mean exercising) and offer up things we know we'll never do.

I've decided that this year will be the exception. There are tons of things I can promise but only few that I can deliver, or help deliver, and those are the ones I want to concentrate on.

For example, ever since I began focusing more on the health care industry, I've learned quite a bit about what can and needs to be done to improve the level of health care in our country for everyone. That includes people living in rural areas, minorities and anyone else who should receive high quality medical treatment.

The key issue is how to best deliver health care to the masses in the most cost-effective manner possible, reducing the redundant and archaic processes in place and making it affordable for everyone.

There are thousands of technical applications and solutions that can be deployed to jump start a new system for health care. And since the New Year is the time when everyone lists their resolutions, anyone who can make a positive impact on health care should vow to do so.

So, this year, here are some resolutions:

• I resolve to being more proactive than ever before in educating people on health care issues, technology innovations, and what can be done to support a better system of health care for everyone.

• I will continue to focus on health care technology - from simple applications to companies that can make a difference in health care.

• When the opportunity arises, I plan on addressing issues at public and industry health care forums.

Finally, I resolve to believe that this is the year that health care becomes Job 1 for all those who can impact an industry and service that is so critical to our lives.

Have a safe, happy and healthy New Year.


Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


New Year's Resolutions

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It's that time of the year again when we all make promises that we won't keep - okay, so maybe we keep a few. But for the most part we overstretch (and I don't mean exercising) and offer up things we know we'll never do.

I've decided that this year will be the exception. There are tons of things I can promise but only few that I can deliver, or help deliver, and those are the ones I want to concentrate on.

For example, ever since I began focusing more on the health care industry, I've learned quite a bit about what can and needs to be done to improve the level of health care in our country for everyone. That includes people living in rural areas, minorities and anyone else who should receive high quality medical treatment.

The key issue is how to best deliver health care to the masses in the most cost-effective manner possible, reducing the redundant and archaic processes in place and making it affordable for everyone.

There are thousands of technical applications and solutions that can be deployed to jump start a new system for health care. And since the New Year is the time when everyone lists their resolutions, anyone who can make a positive impact on health care should vow to do so.

So, this year, here are some resolutions:

• I resolve to being more proactive than ever before in educating people on health care issues, technology innovations, and what can be done to support a better system of health care for everyone.

• I will continue to focus on health care technology - from simple applications to companies that can make a difference in health care.

• When the opportunity arises, I plan on addressing issues at public and industry health care forums.

Finally, I resolve to believe that this is the year that health care becomes Job 1 for all those who can impact an industry and service that is so critical to our lives.

Have a safe, happy and healthy New Year.


Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


Tech Term - Encapsulating Security Payload

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TechTerm.png

Encapsulating Security Payload
(ESP)

Definition: A mechanism to provide confidentiality and integrity protection to IP datagrams.

ESP_Dec 2010.gif

Tech Term - Encapsulating Security Payload

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TechTerm.png

Encapsulating Security Payload
(ESP)

Definition: A mechanism to provide confidentiality and integrity protection to IP datagrams.

ESP_Dec 2010.gif

Tech Term - Intrusion Detection

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TechTerm.pngIntrusion Detection

Definition: Pertaining to techniques which attempt to detect intrusion into a computer or network by observation of actions, security logs, or audit data.

Detection of break-ins or attempts either manually or via software expert systems that operate on logs or other information available on the network.



Intrusion Detection_Dec 2010.gif



Tech Term - Intrusion Detection

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TechTerm.pngIntrusion Detection

Definition: Pertaining to techniques which attempt to detect intrusion into a computer or network by observation of actions, security logs, or audit data.

Detection of break-ins or attempts either manually or via software expert systems that operate on logs or other information available on the network.



Intrusion Detection_Dec 2010.gif



HAPPY HOLIDAYS!!!

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Happy Holidays_Dec 2010.gif

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!!!

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Happy Holidays_Dec 2010.gif

The Night Before Christmas

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The Night Before Christmas
(a wireless parody -- with apologies to
Clement C. Moore)

T'was the night before Christmas, and all
through the land, People were scurrying to get
new technology in their hand.

Careening through malls, in and out of each store,
Searching for phones and tablets and more.

But I was at home with my wireless phone,
Downloading apps and ordering fancy ringtones,
Scanning the app stores to see what was new
To tell all my readers just what they should do.

Through thousands of apps I started to churn,
My fingers so tattered they started to burn,
I thought to myself, "let me jump to health care,"
To find more applications that I could now share.

The screen of my phone was beginning to glow,
As I played mobile games and watched TV shows,
But when fun time was over and shopping was done,
I settled back down waiting for Santa to come.

In just a few minutes I'd fallen asleep,
When a loud noise rang out from the dark and the deep,
I reached for the nightstand to check out my phone,
And quite quickly realized it wasn't my ringtone.

I jumped out of bed to look out on the roof,
Thinking it was Dad who was playing a goof,
I pulled back the curtain and what did appear,
But a hot looking sled, and eight tiny reindeer,

The guy in the suit was a sight to behold,
He wasn't as ancient as what I'd been told,
But more like a superhero with gadgets galore,
Who looked like he'd come from a wireless store.

Reaching into a holster, he pulled out a device,
It resembled an iPad all covered with ice,
The smartphone he used was really quite slick,
So I knew in an instant this dude was St. Nick.

He tapped on the pad, and spoke to it too,
Maybe he was checking Facebook or YouTube,
He adjusted the Femtocell attached to his sled,
His priority access kept him on sked.

Gathering presents and moving with speed,
No wires or plugs did this St. Nick need,
A Bluetooth device dangled from his ruddy left ear,
He jumped down the chimney showing no fear.

He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work,
Filling the stockings, with high-tech gifts and mirth,
His earpiece was buzzing, so he sat on the couch,
Checking his messages this guy was no slouch.

When all was done, he saw I was looking,
He laughed out so loud, I asked "what was cooking?"
"That was your Mom," was his jovial reply,
She sent a text message, "thnx 4 stpng by."

I knew there was more to the message of thanks,
And again I was thinking it was one of Dad's pranks,
The dude didn't give away what Mom really said,
Slid an Android device in my stocking,
and told me, "Get to bed."

He sprang to his sleigh, to his teams gave a whistle,
And away they all flew like the down of a thistle.
But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight,
"Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good-night!"


Follow me on Twitter:
@TechnicalJones



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The Night Before Christmas

| No Comments

The Night Before Christmas
(a wireless parody -- with apologies to
Clement C. Moore)

T'was the night before Christmas, and all
through the land, People were scurrying to get
new technology in their hand.

Careening through malls, in and out of each store,
Searching for phones and tablets and more.

But I was at home with my wireless phone,
Downloading apps and ordering fancy ringtones,
Scanning the app stores to see what was new
To tell all my readers just what they should do.

Through thousands of apps I started to churn,
My fingers so tattered they started to burn,
I thought to myself, "let me jump to health care,"
To find more applications that I could now share.

The screen of my phone was beginning to glow,
As I played mobile games and watched TV shows,
But when fun time was over and shopping was done,
I settled back down waiting for Santa to come.

In just a few minutes I'd fallen asleep,
When a loud noise rang out from the dark and the deep,
I reached for the nightstand to check out my phone,
And quite quickly realized it wasn't my ringtone.

I jumped out of bed to look out on the roof,
Thinking it was Dad who was playing a goof,
I pulled back the curtain and what did appear,
But a hot looking sled, and eight tiny reindeer,

The guy in the suit was a sight to behold,
He wasn't as ancient as what I'd been told,
But more like a superhero with gadgets galore,
Who looked like he'd come from a wireless store.

Reaching into a holster, he pulled out a device,
It resembled an iPad all covered with ice,
The smartphone he used was really quite slick,
So I knew in an instant this dude was St. Nick.

He tapped on the pad, and spoke to it too,
Maybe he was checking Facebook or YouTube,
He adjusted the Femtocell attached to his sled,
His priority access kept him on sked.

Gathering presents and moving with speed,
No wires or plugs did this St. Nick need,
A Bluetooth device dangled from his ruddy left ear,
He jumped down the chimney showing no fear.

He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work,
Filling the stockings, with high-tech gifts and mirth,
His earpiece was buzzing, so he sat on the couch,
Checking his messages this guy was no slouch.

When all was done, he saw I was looking,
He laughed out so loud, I asked "what was cooking?"
"That was your Mom," was his jovial reply,
She sent a text message, "thnx 4 stpng by."

I knew there was more to the message of thanks,
And again I was thinking it was one of Dad's pranks,
The dude didn't give away what Mom really said,
Slid an Android device in my stocking,
and told me, "Get to bed."

He sprang to his sleigh, to his teams gave a whistle,
And away they all flew like the down of a thistle.
But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight,
"Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good-night!"


Follow me on Twitter:
@TechnicalJones



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Tech Term - Public Key Cryptography

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TechTerm.png
Public Key Cryptography

Definition:
Type of cryptography in which the encryption process is publicly available and unprotected, but in which a part of the decryption key is protected so that only a party with knowledge of both parts of the decryption process can decrypt the cipher text.


Public Key Cryptography_Dec 2010.gif

Tech Term - Public Key Cryptography

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TechTerm.png
Public Key Cryptography

Definition:
Type of cryptography in which the encryption process is publicly available and unprotected, but in which a part of the decryption key is protected so that only a party with knowledge of both parts of the decryption process can decrypt the cipher text.


Public Key Cryptography_Dec 2010.gif

Tech Term - Circuit Level Gateway

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TechTerm.pngCircuit Level Gateway

Definition: One form of a firewall. Validates TCP and UDP sessions before opening a connection.

Creates a handshake, and once that takes place passes everything through until the session is ended.



Circuit Level Gateway_Dec 2010.jpg



Tech Term - Circuit Level Gateway

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TechTerm.pngCircuit Level Gateway

Definition: One form of a firewall. Validates TCP and UDP sessions before opening a connection.

Creates a handshake, and once that takes place passes everything through until the session is ended.



Circuit Level Gateway_Dec 2010.jpg



Health Care - What an Experience

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What does the next generation of health care look like?  Who really knows, but technology is currently available to take it to a higher level.  I know enough about the various applications and technologies to be dangerous, and like most others, can offer my own opinion.

That said, it certainly can be better than what we have today. Let me regale you with a friend's recent visit to his doctor.

First, just because you have the tools, doesn't mean you are using them properly, or getting the most productivity out of them.  When entering his doctor's office he immediately felt like he entered a medical facility of the future.

He knew exactly where his payments for service had gone - into retro-fitting the office with computers, scanners, video connections, everything needed to make patients feel like they will receive top-shelf service.

After a kindly, "hello, what's your name," the medical assistant entered his name into a computer - and then proceeds to hand him two forms to complete, the same ones he completed for every annual visit over the past ten years.

But he realized they had a computer system running for several years?  Same information, except he was a year older.

"Isn't this information in my electronic medical record (EMR)?" he asked.  "We had to switch to another system so we have to re-enter it into the new system," she responded.

He thought to himself, "couldn't they just transfer my information electronically between systems?  Isn't that what an EMR or EHR is supposed to do?" 

So not to raise his blood pressure before he saw the doctor he let it slide.

"The doctor will see you now," and with that the assistant sends him into an examination room.  The doctor enters and he notices the doctor has a netbook that's hooked into the medical facility's Wi-Fi network.  Cool, or so he thought.

"I see that your last physical was about a year ago." 

Okay, that's a good start...then it begins....

"What medications are your taking?" 

The same meds you prescribed last year," he said. 

"How old are you?"

"A year older than last year," he quipped. 

"Have you had any surgeries in the past ten years?" 

Hold up!

He knew that information should be in some database, and the doctor should know if he had any over the past year.

"Same as the last time we spoke," he responded. 

"So what do you actually do with that netbook?"

"Enter patient information..."

"And where does that information go?"  he asked suspiciously. 

"To a company in California.  They store it on a server." 

"In my EMR or EHR?" He could see the doctor getting irritated. 

"I believe so...."  Okay, that was it.

My friend suggested to the doctor that he's not only wasting his time but the doctor's, and that of his staff. He told the doctor he could reduce his costs and afford a new Mercedes if he optimized how he used the technology at his disposal.

Collecting data is great, but using and sharing it with others in the health care ecosystem - some of whom he might seek services from in the future - is essential to enhancing the quality of health care in our country.

After explaining how to share services throughout his office, my friend offered him a 10,000 foot overview of how his service in California should be part of a "cloud" that links into a secure and private network of services, applications and platforms that health care professional can access, regardless of location.

The doctor gave my friend one of those "looks," thanked him for the explanation, and reached for his stethoscope.

"Let's move on to the physical," the doctor said.

To this day my friend said he probably should have waited until after the exam to offer his insight, and by the way, he expects to be filling out the same forms next year.

Life goes on . . .  :-)

Have a safe and healthy week.



Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


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Health Care - What an Experience

| No Comments

What does the next generation of health care look like?  Who really knows, but technology is currently available to take it to a higher level.  I know enough about the various applications and technologies to be dangerous, and like most others, can offer my own opinion.

That said, it certainly can be better than what we have today. Let me regale you with a friend's recent visit to his doctor.

First, just because you have the tools, doesn't mean you are using them properly, or getting the most productivity out of them.  When entering his doctor's office he immediately felt like he entered a medical facility of the future.

He knew exactly where his payments for service had gone - into retro-fitting the office with computers, scanners, video connections, everything needed to make patients feel like they will receive top-shelf service.

After a kindly, "hello, what's your name," the medical assistant entered his name into a computer - and then proceeds to hand him two forms to complete, the same ones he completed for every annual visit over the past ten years.

But he realized they had a computer system running for several years?  Same information, except he was a year older.

"Isn't this information in my electronic medical record (EMR)?" he asked.  "We had to switch to another system so we have to re-enter it into the new system," she responded.

He thought to himself, "couldn't they just transfer my information electronically between systems?  Isn't that what an EMR or EHR is supposed to do?" 

So not to raise his blood pressure before he saw the doctor he let it slide.

"The doctor will see you now," and with that the assistant sends him into an examination room.  The doctor enters and he notices the doctor has a netbook that's hooked into the medical facility's Wi-Fi network.  Cool, or so he thought.

"I see that your last physical was about a year ago." 

Okay, that's a good start...then it begins....

"What medications are your taking?" 

The same meds you prescribed last year," he said. 

"How old are you?"

"A year older than last year," he quipped. 

"Have you had any surgeries in the past ten years?" 

Hold up!

He knew that information should be in some database, and the doctor should know if he had any over the past year.

"Same as the last time we spoke," he responded. 

"So what do you actually do with that netbook?"

"Enter patient information..."

"And where does that information go?"  he asked suspiciously. 

"To a company in California.  They store it on a server." 

"In my EMR or EHR?" He could see the doctor getting irritated. 

"I believe so...."  Okay, that was it.

My friend suggested to the doctor that he's not only wasting his time but the doctor's, and that of his staff. He told the doctor he could reduce his costs and afford a new Mercedes if he optimized how he used the technology at his disposal.

Collecting data is great, but using and sharing it with others in the health care ecosystem - some of whom he might seek services from in the future - is essential to enhancing the quality of health care in our country.

After explaining how to share services throughout his office, my friend offered him a 10,000 foot overview of how his service in California should be part of a "cloud" that links into a secure and private network of services, applications and platforms that health care professional can access, regardless of location.

The doctor gave my friend one of those "looks," thanked him for the explanation, and reached for his stethoscope.

"Let's move on to the physical," the doctor said.

To this day my friend said he probably should have waited until after the exam to offer his insight, and by the way, he expects to be filling out the same forms next year.

Life goes on . . .  :-)

Have a safe and healthy week.



Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


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Tech Term - Adware

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TechTerm.pngAdware

Definition:
While not necessarily malware, adware is considered to go beyond the reasonable advertising that one might expect from freeware or shareware.

Typically a separate program that is installed at the same time as a shareware or similar program, adware will usually continue to generate advertising even when the user is not running the originally desired program.

Adware_Dec 2010.jpg



Tech Term - Adware

| No Comments

TechTerm.pngAdware

Definition:
While not necessarily malware, adware is considered to go beyond the reasonable advertising that one might expect from freeware or shareware.

Typically a separate program that is installed at the same time as a shareware or similar program, adware will usually continue to generate advertising even when the user is not running the originally desired program.

Adware_Dec 2010.jpg



Help Wanted: Health IT

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Help Wanted: Health IT

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Tech End

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Tech End

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Tech Term - Port Scan

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TechTerm.pngPort Scan

Definition:
A port scan is a series of messages sent by someone attempting to break into a computer to learn which computer network services, each associated with a "well-known" port number, the computer provides.

Port scanning, a favorite approach of computer cracker, gives the assailant an idea where to probe for weaknesses. Essentially, a port scan consists of sending a message to each port, one at a time.

The kind of response received indicates whether the port is used and can therefore be probed for weakness.



Port Scan_Dec 2010.gif



Tech Term - Port Scan

| No Comments

TechTerm.pngPort Scan

Definition:
A port scan is a series of messages sent by someone attempting to break into a computer to learn which computer network services, each associated with a "well-known" port number, the computer provides.

Port scanning, a favorite approach of computer cracker, gives the assailant an idea where to probe for weaknesses. Essentially, a port scan consists of sending a message to each port, one at a time.

The kind of response received indicates whether the port is used and can therefore be probed for weakness.



Port Scan_Dec 2010.gif



Magic iApps

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Magic iApps

| No Comments

Cloud Computing and Healthcare: The Perfect Storm

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In a recent post, I offered a simple explanation of cloud computing.  For those who missed it, it is basically described as anything that involves delivering hosted services over the Internet, with a variety of delivery options.  A technological innovation that was years in the making.

Over the past couple of years, the weakened economy fostered the adoption of cloud computing by businesses.

An alternative to capital intensive spending for self-hosting, the cloud offers a cost-effective way to provide services through a shared and managed resource.

The cloud takes advantage of the innovations in virtualization and distributed computing, as well as improvements in high-speed Internet access - through wired and wireless connections.

As the health care industry ponders how to best inject the recent spate of technologies into processes and programs that can enhance the quality of service, the cloud offers a way to minimize the cost for deploying applications and services to patients, and companies across the health care ecosystem.

RehabCare is a health care company that uses the cloud to offer its services. The company uses the cloud, and an integrated technology platform, to improve their patient intake and referral process.

It allows them to better manage the way they track, benchmark and improve rehabilitation procedures and how they report and communicate progress to Medicare, patients and their families.

RehabCare will extend its use of the cloud to deploy an Electronic Medical Record platform next year.

Using cloud-based solutions can also be extended to a macro level - cost-effectively and securely sharing patient information and applications among doctors, institutions, insurers, government agencies, etc. - on a statewide and/or nationwide level.

For example, the ability to seamlessly view patient information received from monitoring devices and share it with others in the health care chain can be done in a cloud environment.

At some point, Electronic Medical Records (EMR) and Electronic Healthcare Records (EHR) will be stored in a cloud environment. That said, like any data that travels over the Internet, there needs to be secure access to browser-based EHRs and EMRs, with end-to-end encryption, whether information resides in a private or public cloud.

Sharing patient information in the cloud would enable real-time collaboration among medical experts, faster diagnosis of the condition, and ensure the proper treatment and medication is prescribed.

From time to time I'll report on cloud computing and how it is, or can be, used in health care. As innovative companies look for ways to quickly deploy their services and applications across a variety of mobile devices, the cloud will be a resource that most will not resist.

Have a safe and healthy week.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


Cloud Computing and Healthcare: The Perfect Storm

| No Comments

In a recent post, I offered a simple explanation of cloud computing.  For those who missed it, it is basically described as anything that involves delivering hosted services over the Internet, with a variety of delivery options.  A technological innovation that was years in the making.

Over the past couple of years, the weakened economy fostered the adoption of cloud computing by businesses.

An alternative to capital intensive spending for self-hosting, the cloud offers a cost-effective way to provide services through a shared and managed resource.

The cloud takes advantage of the innovations in virtualization and distributed computing, as well as improvements in high-speed Internet access - through wired and wireless connections.

As the health care industry ponders how to best inject the recent spate of technologies into processes and programs that can enhance the quality of service, the cloud offers a way to minimize the cost for deploying applications and services to patients, and companies across the health care ecosystem.

RehabCare is a health care company that uses the cloud to offer its services. The company uses the cloud, and an integrated technology platform, to improve their patient intake and referral process.

It allows them to better manage the way they track, benchmark and improve rehabilitation procedures and how they report and communicate progress to Medicare, patients and their families.

RehabCare will extend its use of the cloud to deploy an Electronic Medical Record platform next year.

Using cloud-based solutions can also be extended to a macro level - cost-effectively and securely sharing patient information and applications among doctors, institutions, insurers, government agencies, etc. - on a statewide and/or nationwide level.

For example, the ability to seamlessly view patient information received from monitoring devices and share it with others in the health care chain can be done in a cloud environment.

At some point, Electronic Medical Records (EMR) and Electronic Healthcare Records (EHR) will be stored in a cloud environment. That said, like any data that travels over the Internet, there needs to be secure access to browser-based EHRs and EMRs, with end-to-end encryption, whether information resides in a private or public cloud.

Sharing patient information in the cloud would enable real-time collaboration among medical experts, faster diagnosis of the condition, and ensure the proper treatment and medication is prescribed.

From time to time I'll report on cloud computing and how it is, or can be, used in health care. As innovative companies look for ways to quickly deploy their services and applications across a variety of mobile devices, the cloud will be a resource that most will not resist.

Have a safe and healthy week.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


iPad Decisions

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What will you do?


iPad_Dec 2010.jpg



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iPad Decisions

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What will you do?


iPad_Dec 2010.jpg



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mHEALTH WORLD

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mHEALTH WORLD

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TECH TERM - BIOMETRICS

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TechTerm.png
Biometrics

Definition:
The science and technology of measuring and analyzing biological data. Includes technologies that measure and analyze human body characteristics, such as DNA, fingerprints, eye retinas and irises, and voice and facial patterns, for authentication purposes.

In wireless health, biometric data can be collected by a sensor, run through an algorithm or data mining program, and then monitored by a clinician for diagnostic and/or therapeutic purposes.


Biometrics_Dec 2010.gif



TECH TERM - BIOMETRICS

| No Comments
TechTerm.png
Biometrics

Definition:
The science and technology of measuring and analyzing biological data. Includes technologies that measure and analyze human body characteristics, such as DNA, fingerprints, eye retinas and irises, and voice and facial patterns, for authentication purposes.

In wireless health, biometric data can be collected by a sensor, run through an algorithm or data mining program, and then monitored by a clinician for diagnostic and/or therapeutic purposes.


Biometrics_Dec 2010.gif



mHealth Hand

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The technology to hold . . .

Mobile health in your palm


mHealth_Dec 2010.jpg
For more information on
Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:

Privacy

Security

mHealth

mHealth DC 2010

Smartphones



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mHealth Hand

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The technology to hold . . .

Mobile health in your palm


mHealth_Dec 2010.jpg
For more information on
Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:

Privacy

Security

mHealth

mHealth DC 2010

Smartphones



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Implanting the Backbone for Securing Patient Information

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As mentioned in a prior post, securing the privacy of patient information is critical to the adoption, use and growth of telemedicine, and even more so, mobile health care (mHealth).

Innovation and technological enhancements are often cool but should not come at the expense of having people feel uncomfortable that their private health information is an open book for everyone to read.

In 2011, I expect mHealth to be prominent in the news, on the web, at events - even in use by doctors and medical institutions!  Mobility has become one of the few areas not affected by the past couple of years of economic turmoil.

Today, nearly 50 percent of mobile phones sold are smartphones and the recent introduction of tablet devices, like the Apple iPad, invite innovation and new applications, especially for mHealth.

The mHealth App market will continue growing to meet physician demands for mobile access to clinical information and help improve operations as government health care reforms are enacted.

And companies that have one eye looking to support health care initiatives - the other eye focused on adding revenue to the bottom line -- are stepping up efforts to ensure that security and privacy is strongly embedded into every product and service they offer.

Hey, if they can decrease overall health care costs and raise the quality of service, then more power to them. A recent report projects mHealth in the enterprise will topple the $1.5 billion mark by the end of 2014.

Companies across the health care ecosystem - from hospitals, clinics and doctors' offices, to data centers, to internet and communications companies that transport the information - all have security built into their systems and networks.

The encryption algorithms may differ among each, but all are monitored and managed with layers of security to protect patient information.

Consider a company that I spoke with and featured in a video from the mHealth summit - Diversinet - a small company serving the health care food chain.  Its tag line is, "Connected and Protected," and its service is based on a patented technology that provides ultra-secure mHealth applications to protect personal health information stored and exchanged on nearly all kinds of mobile devices.

This same doggedness runs the gamut for most companies involved in supporting mHealth - from those providing systems and platforms to others that develop applications and devices used to remotely monitor patients' wellbeing.

All must adhere to government regulations in order to be compliant across several areas, with the most obvious being security.

These are different than those I categorize as "fun" health applications. You know the apps that tell you that you shouldn't have dessert or you might want to do a few sit-ups. While it's not something that needs to be secure, I would like to keep it between me and my phone.

Have a safe and healthy week.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones



Implanting the Backbone for Securing Patient Information

| No Comments

As mentioned in a prior post, securing the privacy of patient information is critical to the adoption, use and growth of telemedicine, and even more so, mobile health care (mHealth).

Innovation and technological enhancements are often cool but should not come at the expense of having people feel uncomfortable that their private health information is an open book for everyone to read.

In 2011, I expect mHealth to be prominent in the news, on the web, at events - even in use by doctors and medical institutions!  Mobility has become one of the few areas not affected by the past couple of years of economic turmoil.

Today, nearly 50 percent of mobile phones sold are smartphones and the recent introduction of tablet devices, like the Apple iPad, invite innovation and new applications, especially for mHealth.

The mHealth App market will continue growing to meet physician demands for mobile access to clinical information and help improve operations as government health care reforms are enacted.

And companies that have one eye looking to support health care initiatives - the other eye focused on adding revenue to the bottom line -- are stepping up efforts to ensure that security and privacy is strongly embedded into every product and service they offer.

Hey, if they can decrease overall health care costs and raise the quality of service, then more power to them. A recent report projects mHealth in the enterprise will topple the $1.5 billion mark by the end of 2014.

Companies across the health care ecosystem - from hospitals, clinics and doctors' offices, to data centers, to internet and communications companies that transport the information - all have security built into their systems and networks.

The encryption algorithms may differ among each, but all are monitored and managed with layers of security to protect patient information.

Consider a company that I spoke with and featured in a video from the mHealth summit - Diversinet - a small company serving the health care food chain.  Its tag line is, "Connected and Protected," and its service is based on a patented technology that provides ultra-secure mHealth applications to protect personal health information stored and exchanged on nearly all kinds of mobile devices.

This same doggedness runs the gamut for most companies involved in supporting mHealth - from those providing systems and platforms to others that develop applications and devices used to remotely monitor patients' wellbeing.

All must adhere to government regulations in order to be compliant across several areas, with the most obvious being security.

These are different than those I categorize as "fun" health applications. You know the apps that tell you that you shouldn't have dessert or you might want to do a few sit-ups. While it's not something that needs to be secure, I would like to keep it between me and my phone.

Have a safe and healthy week.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones



Global Pain Tech

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All around the world
technology continues to help those in need . . .


Support technology will help chronic pain sufferers


Rural UK_Dec 2010.jpg



Global Pain Tech

| No Comments


All around the world
technology continues to help those in need . . .


Support technology will help chronic pain sufferers


Rural UK_Dec 2010.jpg



TECH TERM - SMURFING

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TechTerm.pngSmurfing

Definition:
  A denial of service attack in which an attacker spoofs the source address of an echo-request ICMP (ping) packet to the broadcast address for a network, causing the machines in the network to respond en masse to the victim thereby clogging its network.



Smurfing_Dec 2010.jpg

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TECH TERM - SMURFING

| No Comments

TechTerm.pngSmurfing

Definition:
  A denial of service attack in which an attacker spoofs the source address of an echo-request ICMP (ping) packet to the broadcast address for a network, causing the machines in the network to respond en masse to the victim thereby clogging its network.



Smurfing_Dec 2010.jpg

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