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Leroy Jones, Jr. is the creator of Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.

November 2010 Archives

TELEHEALTH RURAL

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TELEHEALTH RURAL

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AGING & HEALTH CARE TECH

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Technology continues to change how we care for
our expanding aging population:

Wired Up at Home to Monitor Illnesses

AA_Seniors_2010.jpg



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AGING & HEALTH CARE TECH

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Technology continues to change how we care for
our expanding aging population:

Wired Up at Home to Monitor Illnesses

AA_Seniors_2010.jpg



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Tech Terms - Rootkit

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TechTerm.pngRootkit

Definition:
A hacker security tool that captures passwords and message traffic to and from a computer.

A collection of tools that allows a hacker to provide a backdoor into a system, collect information on other systems on the network, mask the fact that the system is compromised, and much more.

Rootkit is a classic example of Trojan Horse software.  Rootkit is available for a wide range of operating systems.



Rootkit_Nov 2010.jpg

Tech Terms - Rootkit

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TechTerm.pngRootkit

Definition:
A hacker security tool that captures passwords and message traffic to and from a computer.

A collection of tools that allows a hacker to provide a backdoor into a system, collect information on other systems on the network, mask the fact that the system is compromised, and much more.

Rootkit is a classic example of Trojan Horse software.  Rootkit is available for a wide range of operating systems.



Rootkit_Nov 2010.jpg

HAPPY THANKSGIVING 2010

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Thanksgiving_Nov 2010.jpgHave a safe and great holiday.

Don't eat too much!!!  :-)





HAPPY THANKSGIVING 2010

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Thanksgiving_Nov 2010.jpgHave a safe and great holiday.

Don't eat too much!!!  :-)





Tech Terms - RSA Algorithm

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TechTerm.pngRSA Algorithm

Definition: RSA stands for Rivest-Shamir-Aldeman. A public-key cryptographic algorithm that hinges on the assumption that the factoring of the product of two large primes is difficult.

RSA Algorithm_Nov 2010.gif



Tech Terms - RSA Algorithm

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TechTerm.pngRSA Algorithm

Definition: RSA stands for Rivest-Shamir-Aldeman. A public-key cryptographic algorithm that hinges on the assumption that the factoring of the product of two large primes is difficult.

RSA Algorithm_Nov 2010.gif



Tech Term - Penetration Testing

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TechTerm.pngPenetration Testing

Definition: The portion of security testing in which the evaluators attempt to circumvent the security features of a system.

The evaluators may be assumed to use all system design and implementation documentation, that may include listings of system source code, manuals, and circuit diagrams. The evaluators work under the same constraints applied to ordinary users.


Penetration Testing_Nov 2010.jpg





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Tech Term - Penetration Testing

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TechTerm.pngPenetration Testing

Definition: The portion of security testing in which the evaluators attempt to circumvent the security features of a system.

The evaluators may be assumed to use all system design and implementation documentation, that may include listings of system source code, manuals, and circuit diagrams. The evaluators work under the same constraints applied to ordinary users.


Penetration Testing_Nov 2010.jpg





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Tech Term - Automated Information System

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Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Automated Information System (AIS)

Definition: Any equipment of an interconnected system or subsystems of equipment that is used in the automatic acquisition, storage, manipulation, control, display, transmission, or reception of data and includes software, firmware, and hardware.

AIS_Nov 2010.jpg


Tech Term - Automated Information System

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Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Automated Information System (AIS)

Definition: Any equipment of an interconnected system or subsystems of equipment that is used in the automatic acquisition, storage, manipulation, control, display, transmission, or reception of data and includes software, firmware, and hardware.

AIS_Nov 2010.jpg



A recent report by research2guidance estimates that mHealth services will reach some 500 million users by 2010. 

But there is a difference between "reaching" all smartphone users and actually having them "use" the tens-of-thousands of applications currently available. 

Currently, only about nine percent of adult mobile device users actually use a health care application.  This number is expected to increase substantially as the mobile generation looks to do more things while on the go.

That same report highlights the largest barrier to adoption is privacy - how do people know that their personal health information is not out there for everyone to see and use. 

More than 50 percent of those surveyed said they were very or somewhat uncomfortable with sharing this information through a mobile application.

As you can imagine, most people will download free applications that are fun to have or provide general information on health care.

For example, applications like iTriage offer information on symptoms, diseases and medical procedures as well as a nationwide directory of hospitals, urgent care facilities, retail clinics, pharmacies and physicians.  Good information to have, but nothing that requires extreme security or privacy.

On the other hand, having sensitive information on illnesses, prescriptions, surgeries, lab test results and other personal data flying through the air among doctors, hospitals, insurers, etc. is a concern to everyone.

Most folks throughout the health care ecosystem believe mHealth will enhance the quality of service and lower costs for patients, understanding, but how companies go about securing the information is paramount for acceptance by patients.

People are just now getting comfortable with online privacy, and moving that same perception to the mobile device might take some time.  As long as there is a guarantee of security, and the benefits are simply spelled out, adoption will happen.

While
Euro RSCG Worldwide predicts nearly 45 percent of smartphone users said they will use a health care application in the future, it would be interesting to know what percentage of those involved sharing personal information.

Companies and government agencies throughout the mHealth ecosystem need to reassure people that their personal health information is safer than keeping money in the bank. 

mHealth can provide a cure for what's ailing health care, and with the proper education, patients will begin feeling good about using mobile applications.

In the coming weeks, I'll address some of the specific initiatives and systems companies and agencies are using to protect and secure the private health care information of patients.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


For more information on
Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


Privacy

Security

mHealth

mHealth DC 2010

Smartphones


Privacy and Security: Top Issue in Patients Adopting to mHealth

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A recent report by research2guidance estimates that mHealth services will reach some 500 million users by 2010. 

But there is a difference between "reaching" all smartphone users and actually having them "use" the tens-of-thousands of applications currently available. 

Currently, only about nine percent of adult mobile device users actually use a health care application.  This number is expected to increase substantially as the mobile generation looks to do more things while on the go.

That same report highlights the largest barrier to adoption is privacy - how do people know that their personal health information is not out there for everyone to see and use. 

More than 50 percent of those surveyed said they were very or somewhat uncomfortable with sharing this information through a mobile application.

As you can imagine, most people will download free applications that are fun to have or provide general information on health care.

For example, applications like iTriage offer information on symptoms, diseases and medical procedures as well as a nationwide directory of hospitals, urgent care facilities, retail clinics, pharmacies and physicians.  Good information to have, but nothing that requires extreme security or privacy.

On the other hand, having sensitive information on illnesses, prescriptions, surgeries, lab test results and other personal data flying through the air among doctors, hospitals, insurers, etc. is a concern to everyone.

Most folks throughout the health care ecosystem believe mHealth will enhance the quality of service and lower costs for patients, understanding, but how companies go about securing the information is paramount for acceptance by patients.

People are just now getting comfortable with online privacy, and moving that same perception to the mobile device might take some time.  As long as there is a guarantee of security, and the benefits are simply spelled out, adoption will happen.

While
Euro RSCG Worldwide predicts nearly 45 percent of smartphone users said they will use a health care application in the future, it would be interesting to know what percentage of those involved sharing personal information.

Companies and government agencies throughout the mHealth ecosystem need to reassure people that their personal health information is safer than keeping money in the bank. 

mHealth can provide a cure for what's ailing health care, and with the proper education, patients will begin feeling good about using mobile applications.

In the coming weeks, I'll address some of the specific initiatives and systems companies and agencies are using to protect and secure the private health care information of patients.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones


For more information on
Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


Privacy

Security

mHealth

mHealth DC 2010

Smartphones


mHEALTH & MOTHERS

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mHEALTH & MOTHERS

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mHEALTH INDIA

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mHEALTH INDIA

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TECH TERMS - SWITCHING HUB

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngSwitching Hub

Definition:
A device used to segment network traffic. Switching hubs limit network contention by reducing the number of nodes on a segment.

A packets destination is stored in a routing table and all
future packets with the same address are quickly connected to the appropriate end segment.



Switching Hub_Nov 2010.gif



TECH TERMS - SWITCHING HUB

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngSwitching Hub

Definition:
A device used to segment network traffic. Switching hubs limit network contention by reducing the number of nodes on a segment.

A packets destination is stored in a routing table and all
future packets with the same address are quickly connected to the appropriate end segment.



Switching Hub_Nov 2010.gif



TECH TERM - SQL INJECTION

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Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.pngStructured Query Language (SQL) Injection

Definition: Is an attack in which malicious code is inserted into strings that are later passed to an instance of SQL Server for parsing and execution. Any procedure that constructs SQL statements should be reviewed for injection vulnerabilities because SQL Server will execute all syntactically valid queries that it receives.

Even parameterized data can be manipulated by a skilled and determined attacker.

The primary form of SQL injection consists of direct insertion of code into user-input variables that are concatenated with SQL commands and executed. A less direct attack injects malicious code into strings that are destined for storage in a table or as metadata.

When the stored strings are subsequently concatenated into a dynamic SQL command, the malicious code is executed.

The injection process works by prematurely terminating a text string and appending a new command. Because the inserted command may have additional strings appended to it before it is executed, the malefactor terminates the injected string with a comment mark "--".

Subsequent text is ignored at execution time.

SQL_Nov 2010.png

TECH TERM - SQL INJECTION

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Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.pngStructured Query Language (SQL) Injection

Definition: Is an attack in which malicious code is inserted into strings that are later passed to an instance of SQL Server for parsing and execution. Any procedure that constructs SQL statements should be reviewed for injection vulnerabilities because SQL Server will execute all syntactically valid queries that it receives.

Even parameterized data can be manipulated by a skilled and determined attacker.

The primary form of SQL injection consists of direct insertion of code into user-input variables that are concatenated with SQL commands and executed. A less direct attack injects malicious code into strings that are destined for storage in a table or as metadata.

When the stored strings are subsequently concatenated into a dynamic SQL command, the malicious code is executed.

The injection process works by prematurely terminating a text string and appending a new command. Because the inserted command may have additional strings appended to it before it is executed, the malefactor terminates the injected string with a comment mark "--".

Subsequent text is ignored at execution time.

SQL_Nov 2010.png

Sci-Fi on Display at mHealth Summit

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If you were looking for "wow" technology that could be used on a daily basis by patients, doctors, hospitals and others in the health care industry, this week's mHealth Summit showcased it all!

The only thing that seemed to be missing was the Tricorder used by Dr. McCoy on Star Trek.  Devices to remotely monitor your heart rate, applications that let you know what prescriptions to take when, services that allow doctors to securely share patient information using a smartphone, and the list goes on.  They were all on display.

As someone who firmly believes there are technological solutions that can offer Americans throughout the country -- in both rural and metro areas -- higher quality health care services at more affordable prices, I was truly impressed at what I saw at the summit.

And I had the opportunity to speak with many of the companies exhibiting these products and services.  Some of these conversations are available on the site. (See: mHealth DC 2010)

In my column a couple of weeks ago I mentioned that health care technology was outpacing adoption and after walking the exhibit floor at the summit, I believe that is still the case.

But the good news is that we all know that mobile devices and applications are being adopted by millions of people and that in many cases the use of mobile phones that do more will continue to grow.  That holds true as much in the health care industry as it does in our everyday lives.

Companies supporting these mobile applications and services are smart enough to understand that broad adoption and acceptance will only happen when the health care industry and the general public buy into the benefits of mobile health care (mHealth).

As far as the summit went, an educational component, or a "what's in it for me" portion, was missing.  Company salespeople and executives were quick to point out the benefits their applications or services offered potential customers and users but there is a need to distribute that knowledge outside the four walls of the convention center.   

Knowing how a service or application works, how it changes the interaction among patients, doctors and insurance companies, or how it can lower the cost of services are basic questions that need to be addressed in order to reach the comfort zone for adoption.  Basic education is essential.

These are some of the areas I intend to cover in the future - including one-on-one interviews with companies supporting health care.  Stay tuned and hopefully I will keep you tuned in.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones



Sci-Fi on Display at mHealth Summit

| No Comments
 

If you were looking for "wow" technology that could be used on a daily basis by patients, doctors, hospitals and others in the health care industry, this week's mHealth Summit showcased it all!

The only thing that seemed to be missing was the Tricorder used by Dr. McCoy on Star Trek.  Devices to remotely monitor your heart rate, applications that let you know what prescriptions to take when, services that allow doctors to securely share patient information using a smartphone, and the list goes on.  They were all on display.

As someone who firmly believes there are technological solutions that can offer Americans throughout the country -- in both rural and metro areas -- higher quality health care services at more affordable prices, I was truly impressed at what I saw at the summit.

And I had the opportunity to speak with many of the companies exhibiting these products and services.  Some of these conversations are available on the site. (See: mHealth DC 2010)

In my column a couple of weeks ago I mentioned that health care technology was outpacing adoption and after walking the exhibit floor at the summit, I believe that is still the case.

But the good news is that we all know that mobile devices and applications are being adopted by millions of people and that in many cases the use of mobile phones that do more will continue to grow.  That holds true as much in the health care industry as it does in our everyday lives.

Companies supporting these mobile applications and services are smart enough to understand that broad adoption and acceptance will only happen when the health care industry and the general public buy into the benefits of mobile health care (mHealth).

As far as the summit went, an educational component, or a "what's in it for me" portion, was missing.  Company salespeople and executives were quick to point out the benefits their applications or services offered potential customers and users but there is a need to distribute that knowledge outside the four walls of the convention center.   

Knowing how a service or application works, how it changes the interaction among patients, doctors and insurance companies, or how it can lower the cost of services are basic questions that need to be addressed in order to reach the comfort zone for adoption.  Basic education is essential.

These are some of the areas I intend to cover in the future - including one-on-one interviews with companies supporting health care.  Stay tuned and hopefully I will keep you tuned in.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones



mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010: TELEMEDICINE AFRICA

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Interview with Dr. Moretlo Molefi



Managing Director of Telemedicine Africa

mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010: TELEMEDICINE AFRICA

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Interview with Dr. Moretlo Molefi



Managing Director of Telemedicine Africa

mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010: HOUSE CALL (SOUTH AFRICA)

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House Call:

Dr VR_Nov 2010.jpgThe only medial talk show in South Africa hosted by
Dr. Victor Ramathesele.


# # #


Interview with Thandi Ramathesele of
IZWI Multimedia




mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010: HOUSE CALL (SOUTH AFRICA)

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House Call:

Dr VR_Nov 2010.jpgThe only medial talk show in South Africa hosted by
Dr. Victor Ramathesele.


# # #


Interview with Thandi Ramathesele of
IZWI Multimedia




mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010: SOTERA

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Interview with:



Gary Manning
Sotera



mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010: SOTERA

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Interview with:



Gary Manning
Sotera



mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010: WEST WIRELESS HEALTH

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Talking about the
Wireless Pregnancy Remote Monitoring Kit with:







mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010: WEST WIRELESS HEALTH

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Talking about the
Wireless Pregnancy Remote Monitoring Kit with:







mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010: DIVERSINET

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Interview with Jay Couse of Diversinet












mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010: DIVERSINET

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Interview with Jay Couse of Diversinet












mHealth Summit DC 2010: 3G Doctor

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mHealth Summit DC 2010: 3G Doctor

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MORE . . . mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010

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More . . . (#mhs10):

#mHS10_1_1.JPG#mHS10_2_4.JPG
#mHS10_4_6.JPG#mHS10_3_5.JPG
#mHS10_11_3.JPG#mHS10_10_2.JPG#mHS10_9_11.JPG#mHS10_8_10.JPG#mHS10_7_9.JPG#mHS10_6_8.JPG#mHS10_5_7.JPG
More to come . . .





MORE . . . mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010

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More . . . (#mhs10):

#mHS10_1_1.JPG#mHS10_2_4.JPG
#mHS10_4_6.JPG#mHS10_3_5.JPG
#mHS10_11_3.JPG#mHS10_10_2.JPG#mHS10_9_11.JPG#mHS10_8_10.JPG#mHS10_7_9.JPG#mHS10_6_8.JPG#mHS10_5_7.JPG
More to come . . .





mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010

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Welcome to the mHealth Summit (#mhs10). . .


1.JPG
2.JPG4.JPG3.JPGMore to come . . .

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mHEALTH SUMMIT DC ~ 2010

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Welcome to the mHealth Summit (#mhs10). . .


1.JPG
2.JPG4.JPG3.JPGMore to come . . .

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TECH TERM - CLOUD COMPUTING

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngCloud Computing

Definition
: Is a general term for anything that involves delivering hosted services over the Internet.  These services are broadly divided into three categories: Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IAAS), Platform-as-a-Service (PAAS) and Software-as-a-Service (SAAS).

The name cloud computing was inspired by the cloud symbol that's often used to represent the Internet in flowcharts and diagrams.

A cloud service has three distinct characteristics that differentiate it from traditional hosting. It is sold on demand, typically by the minute or the hour; it is elastic -- a user can have as much or as little of a service as they want at any given time; and the service is fully managed by the provider (the consumer needs nothing but a personal computer and Internet access).

Significant innovations in virtualization and distributed computing, as well as improved access to high-speed Internet and a weak economy, have accelerated interest in cloud computing.

Cloud Computing_Nov 2010.gif

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TECH TERM - CLOUD COMPUTING

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngCloud Computing

Definition
: Is a general term for anything that involves delivering hosted services over the Internet.  These services are broadly divided into three categories: Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IAAS), Platform-as-a-Service (PAAS) and Software-as-a-Service (SAAS).

The name cloud computing was inspired by the cloud symbol that's often used to represent the Internet in flowcharts and diagrams.

A cloud service has three distinct characteristics that differentiate it from traditional hosting. It is sold on demand, typically by the minute or the hour; it is elastic -- a user can have as much or as little of a service as they want at any given time; and the service is fully managed by the provider (the consumer needs nothing but a personal computer and Internet access).

Significant innovations in virtualization and distributed computing, as well as improved access to high-speed Internet and a weak economy, have accelerated interest in cloud computing.

Cloud Computing_Nov 2010.gif

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As the state of health care continues to maintain a top position in the news each day, the need to understand what issues are out there, and what's being done to improve them, is important to everyone.

While there are as many diverse opinions as there are people, no one expects the average Joe or Jane to understand the intricacies that are bandied about throughout the ecosystem of companies and government agencies trying to make the quality and cost of health care better for Americans.

But there are some areas and terms the average person should be aware of, and without getting into excruciating detail, I will try to help. 

If we truly believe that technology can help foster a better health care system, then the first area that needs to be addressed is getting everyone's medical history into something called an Electronic Health Record (EHR).

The EHR allows doctors, hospitals, employers, insurers and government to easily share medical information on patients.

So, for example, if you are on vacation across the country and have to visit the emergency room, doctors can look at X-rays, find out what medications you might be taking, etc., giving them all the pertinent information they require prior to diagnosing and treating your illness.

Now at this point, you should be asking yourself about the privacy of the information. Suffice it to say that the information is secure and private, and something I will address in an upcoming letter.

Okay, so it's private, but how does the medical information get into the EHR?

Whenever you visit a physician, specialist, laboratory, hospital, etc., it is incumbent on them to enter the information into a patient's Electronic Medical Record (EMR) - which is different than the EHR. The EMR is actually the legal record created and the source of data for the EHR.

The EMR is a component of a local stand-alone health information system that allows storage, retrieval and modification of records.

Sounds good, but the adoption of EMR's has been slow - which then impacts the EHR - and progress than can be injected by the adoption of technological innovations that support improved health care.

According to sources, the slow adoption of EMRs by physician practices, the impractical nature of a national health information network, the difficulty of creating interoperability standards and government inaction are some causes of the delays.

Next time you visit your family physician, have to go for a blood test, or for some other medical procedure, make sure to tell them that you want the information updated on your EMR so you know that your EHR can be shared with others in the medical community.


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As the state of health care continues to maintain a top position in the news each day, the need to understand what issues are out there, and what's being done to improve them, is important to everyone.

While there are as many diverse opinions as there are people, no one expects the average Joe or Jane to understand the intricacies that are bandied about throughout the ecosystem of companies and government agencies trying to make the quality and cost of health care better for Americans.

But there are some areas and terms the average person should be aware of, and without getting into excruciating detail, I will try to help. 

If we truly believe that technology can help foster a better health care system, then the first area that needs to be addressed is getting everyone's medical history into something called an Electronic Health Record (EHR).

The EHR allows doctors, hospitals, employers, insurers and government to easily share medical information on patients.

So, for example, if you are on vacation across the country and have to visit the emergency room, doctors can look at X-rays, find out what medications you might be taking, etc., giving them all the pertinent information they require prior to diagnosing and treating your illness.

Now at this point, you should be asking yourself about the privacy of the information. Suffice it to say that the information is secure and private, and something I will address in an upcoming letter.

Okay, so it's private, but how does the medical information get into the EHR?

Whenever you visit a physician, specialist, laboratory, hospital, etc., it is incumbent on them to enter the information into a patient's Electronic Medical Record (EMR) - which is different than the EHR. The EMR is actually the legal record created and the source of data for the EHR.

The EMR is a component of a local stand-alone health information system that allows storage, retrieval and modification of records.

Sounds good, but the adoption of EMR's has been slow - which then impacts the EHR - and progress than can be injected by the adoption of technological innovations that support improved health care.

According to sources, the slow adoption of EMRs by physician practices, the impractical nature of a national health information network, the difficulty of creating interoperability standards and government inaction are some causes of the delays.

Next time you visit your family physician, have to go for a blood test, or for some other medical procedure, make sure to tell them that you want the information updated on your EMR so you know that your EHR can be shared with others in the medical community.


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SMART BAR CODE

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SMART BAR CODE

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GADGET 21

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So what do you think?

What do you like?



Gadget_Nov 2010.jpg



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GADGET 21

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So what do you think?

What do you like?



Gadget_Nov 2010.jpg



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HEALTH TECHNOLOGY WALLS

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More work to be done:


How do you break them down?


Health IT_Nov 2010.jpg
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HEALTH TECHNOLOGY WALLS

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More work to be done:


How do you break them down?


Health IT_Nov 2010.jpg
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