TechnicalJones.com

Author

Leroy Jones, Jr. is the creator of Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.

October 2010 Archives

TECH TERMS - NAK ATTACK

| No Comments

TechTerm.pngNegative Acknowledgment
(Nak Attack)


Definition: A penetration technique which capitalizes on a potential weakness in an operating system that does not handle asynchronous interrupts properly and thus, leaves the system in an unprotected state during such interrupts.


Nak Attack_Oct 2010.jpg

TECH TERMS - NAK ATTACK

| No Comments

TechTerm.pngNegative Acknowledgment
(Nak Attack)


Definition: A penetration technique which capitalizes on a potential weakness in an operating system that does not handle asynchronous interrupts properly and thus, leaves the system in an unprotected state during such interrupts.


Nak Attack_Oct 2010.jpg

mHEALTH: HOMELESS

| No Comments

Health care technology for all:

Homeless get mobile health care


mHealth Homeless_Oct 2010.jpg

Enhanced by Zemanta

mHEALTH: HOMELESS

| No Comments

Health care technology for all:

Homeless get mobile health care


mHealth Homeless_Oct 2010.jpg

Enhanced by Zemanta

As the mHealth Summit in Washington DC approaches in a couple of weeks, I expect the excitement to only be outpaced by the hype that often surrounds technology shows like these.

Companies will showcase their devices and applications for monitoring patients, sending medical scans, prescribing meds, filing insurance claims and diagnosing injuries, while organizations in the health care industry continue supporting technical upgrades that can offer a high quality of service and reduce the even higher cost of providing health care.  Been there, done that.

Skepticism aside, I look forward to attending these events.  I enjoy speaking with people who work throughout the health care ecosystem because I am a firm believer that technology can, and will, provide solutions to a number of issues facing this industry - and we all know there is no shortage of issues.

All you need to do is look at the annual amount of money spent on health care to understand why something needs to be done.  According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, approximately $2.2 trillion was spent on health care in 2007.  Fast forward to 2018 and health care spending is estimated to skyrocket to $4.4 trillion.   This is assuming the current health care system remains intact.  So, in ten years, things like prescriptions, tests and insurance premiums will cost much, much more than they do today!

Health care events continue to promise, "this is the year" when some of the latest and greatest technology will finally make things better.  But alas, we've been hearing that for years.  Five to ten years ago telemedicine was prescribed as the solution to enhance the quality of services and reduce costs. Today, it is how we'll be able to do those same things telemedicine promised on a mobile phone. 

What I have noticed is that enhancements to medical technology is outpacing acceptance.  Patients, doctors, hospitals, insurance companies, and others, all need to do a better job of utilizing some of the technical instruments that are available to them.  They also need enact education programs for all these groups so they can make knowledgeable decisions on alternative ways of managing their health care. 

The lack of a basic understanding of how technology can positively impact health care -- from when a patient walks into a doctor's office, to receiving emergency treatment across the country, to eliminating the redundancy of completing the same insurance forms -- needs to be addressed.  It's one of the things I hope is recognized and addressed at the mHealth event.

It is often said that ignorance is bliss.  In the case of health care, it is curable...through technology.



Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones

Gearing Up for the mHealth Summit - Promise or Provision?

| No Comments

As the mHealth Summit in Washington DC approaches in a couple of weeks, I expect the excitement to only be outpaced by the hype that often surrounds technology shows like these.

Companies will showcase their devices and applications for monitoring patients, sending medical scans, prescribing meds, filing insurance claims and diagnosing injuries, while organizations in the health care industry continue supporting technical upgrades that can offer a high quality of service and reduce the even higher cost of providing health care.  Been there, done that.

Skepticism aside, I look forward to attending these events.  I enjoy speaking with people who work throughout the health care ecosystem because I am a firm believer that technology can, and will, provide solutions to a number of issues facing this industry - and we all know there is no shortage of issues.

All you need to do is look at the annual amount of money spent on health care to understand why something needs to be done.  According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, approximately $2.2 trillion was spent on health care in 2007.  Fast forward to 2018 and health care spending is estimated to skyrocket to $4.4 trillion.   This is assuming the current health care system remains intact.  So, in ten years, things like prescriptions, tests and insurance premiums will cost much, much more than they do today!

Health care events continue to promise, "this is the year" when some of the latest and greatest technology will finally make things better.  But alas, we've been hearing that for years.  Five to ten years ago telemedicine was prescribed as the solution to enhance the quality of services and reduce costs. Today, it is how we'll be able to do those same things telemedicine promised on a mobile phone. 

What I have noticed is that enhancements to medical technology is outpacing acceptance.  Patients, doctors, hospitals, insurance companies, and others, all need to do a better job of utilizing some of the technical instruments that are available to them.  They also need enact education programs for all these groups so they can make knowledgeable decisions on alternative ways of managing their health care. 

The lack of a basic understanding of how technology can positively impact health care -- from when a patient walks into a doctor's office, to receiving emergency treatment across the country, to eliminating the redundancy of completing the same insurance forms -- needs to be addressed.  It's one of the things I hope is recognized and addressed at the mHealth event.

It is often said that ignorance is bliss.  In the case of health care, it is curable...through technology.



Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones

REAL WORLD EHR

| No Comments

REAL WORLD EHR

| No Comments

PRIVATE GOOGLE

| No Comments

PRIVATE GOOGLE

| No Comments

THANKS!

| No Comments

First I'd like to thank all those Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr. supporters who have been coming to the website for the past 2 plus years -- and for you first-timers, welcome. 

Since launching the website, I tried offering visitors a broad overview of enhanced or new technologies that changed the way we worked, lived and played. 

My intention was to provide a place to educate as many people as possible through daily updates on terminology, products, services, applications, etc., that made their way onto our desks and laps, and now into the palms of our hands.

The pace of innovation is staggering, and keeping up with all that is going on can be mind boggling.   Add to that the surrounding topics and issues impacted by innovation and you'll find yourself in a quagmire of technologies that in some way, shape or form, promise to make life simpler, work more productive, or services less expensive.

In the coming months the website will take on a new look and feel.  But not to worry.  I will continue providing the same kind of information you want whether you access it online or receive it through Twitter.   Easy and simple explanations of topics you care about most and how new technologies relate to them.

Regular Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr. visitors know that I have a penchant for addressing and educating them on certain topics - one is healthcare.

I believe solving this issue is one of the greatest challenges our government and the American people face today, and in the future.  Costs are out of control, quality of service has degraded, and the entire infrastructure for the healthcare system needs to be revamped.

Technology can provide the foundation and building blocks to support a national healthcare system that allows for sharing of Electronic Medical Records, eliminate redundancy, and ultimately ensure that patients receive the best possible services, from the best physicians, at significantly lower rates than they pay today. 

For example, I know a retiree who just received their 2011 premium from their healthcare provider that was more than 30 percent higher than 2010!  And, they spent nearly one hour on hold waiting for a representative to enroll, just to receive the same level of benefits as the prior year. 

So, while I will continue offering Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr. visitors information on the latest technologies, I will focus even a bit more on those impacting healthcare. 

This includes weekly editorials, interviews with companies focusing on electronic health records, rural health care,  and of course technologies, including mobile healthcare - all that will touch our lives professional and personally.

I will be attending the 2010 mHealth Summit in Washington, D.C. from November 8-10 and would be happy to meet and chat with you during my free time at the show.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones




THANKS!

| No Comments

First I'd like to thank all those Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr. supporters who have been coming to the website for the past 2 plus years -- and for you first-timers, welcome. 

Since launching the website, I tried offering visitors a broad overview of enhanced or new technologies that changed the way we worked, lived and played. 

My intention was to provide a place to educate as many people as possible through daily updates on terminology, products, services, applications, etc., that made their way onto our desks and laps, and now into the palms of our hands.

The pace of innovation is staggering, and keeping up with all that is going on can be mind boggling.   Add to that the surrounding topics and issues impacted by innovation and you'll find yourself in a quagmire of technologies that in some way, shape or form, promise to make life simpler, work more productive, or services less expensive.

In the coming months the website will take on a new look and feel.  But not to worry.  I will continue providing the same kind of information you want whether you access it online or receive it through Twitter.   Easy and simple explanations of topics you care about most and how new technologies relate to them.

Regular Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr. visitors know that I have a penchant for addressing and educating them on certain topics - one is healthcare.

I believe solving this issue is one of the greatest challenges our government and the American people face today, and in the future.  Costs are out of control, quality of service has degraded, and the entire infrastructure for the healthcare system needs to be revamped.

Technology can provide the foundation and building blocks to support a national healthcare system that allows for sharing of Electronic Medical Records, eliminate redundancy, and ultimately ensure that patients receive the best possible services, from the best physicians, at significantly lower rates than they pay today. 

For example, I know a retiree who just received their 2011 premium from their healthcare provider that was more than 30 percent higher than 2010!  And, they spent nearly one hour on hold waiting for a representative to enroll, just to receive the same level of benefits as the prior year. 

So, while I will continue offering Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr. visitors information on the latest technologies, I will focus even a bit more on those impacting healthcare. 

This includes weekly editorials, interviews with companies focusing on electronic health records, rural health care,  and of course technologies, including mobile healthcare - all that will touch our lives professional and personally.

I will be attending the 2010 mHealth Summit in Washington, D.C. from November 8-10 and would be happy to meet and chat with you during my free time at the show.

Follow me on Twitter: @TechnicalJones




TECH TERMS - DATA DRIVEN ATTACK

| No Comments

Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.pngData Driven Attack

Definition: A form of attack that is encoded in innocuous seeming data which is executed by a user or a process to implement an attack.

A data driven attack is a concern for firewalls, since it may get through the firewall in data form and launch an attack against a system behind the firewall.



DataDrivenAttack_Oct 2010.png


TECH TERMS - DATA DRIVEN ATTACK

| No Comments

Thumbnail image for TechTerm_Image 2008.pngData Driven Attack

Definition: A form of attack that is encoded in innocuous seeming data which is executed by a user or a process to implement an attack.

A data driven attack is a concern for firewalls, since it may get through the firewall in data form and launch an attack against a system behind the firewall.



DataDrivenAttack_Oct 2010.png


HEALTH APPS & SMART LOVE

| No Comments

Hope to have a podcast with the full details soon . . . 


In the meantime, check out this article:

Survey: Health Apps a Big Hit on Smartphones

HealthApp_Oct 2010.jpg






Enhanced by Zemanta

HEALTH APPS & SMART LOVE

| No Comments

Hope to have a podcast with the full details soon . . . 


In the meantime, check out this article:

Survey: Health Apps a Big Hit on Smartphones

HealthApp_Oct 2010.jpg






Enhanced by Zemanta

PHONE HOSPITALS - AFRICA

| No Comments

What a great story:

Africa is saving lives by turning mobile phones into hospitals

Makes you love technology!


PhoneHospital_Oct 2010.jpg

Enhanced by Zemanta

PHONE HOSPITALS - AFRICA

| No Comments

What a great story:

Africa is saving lives by turning mobile phones into hospitals

Makes you love technology!


PhoneHospital_Oct 2010.jpg

Enhanced by Zemanta

PRIVACY FACE

| No Comments

PRIVACY FACE

| No Comments

HEALTH TERMS - NATIONAL PROVIDER IDENTIFIER

| No Comments


Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for HealthCareTerm.National Provider Identifier (NPI): The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 requires the adoption of a
standard unique identifier for health care providers.


The NPI Final Rule issued January 23, 2004 adopted the NPI as this standard. The NPI is a 10-digit, intelligence free numeric identifier (10 digit number).

Intelligence free means that the numbers do not carry information about health care  providers, such as the state in which they practice or their provider type or specialization.

The NPI will replace health care provider identifiers in use today in HIPAA standard transactions.

Those numbers include Medicare legacy IDs (UPIN, OSCAR, PIN, and National Supplier Clearinghouse or NSC).

The provider's NPI will not change and will remain with the provider regardless of job or location changes.

(See: NPI Registry)

Numbers_Oct 2010.jpg




HEALTH TERMS - NATIONAL PROVIDER IDENTIFIER

| No Comments


Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for HealthCareTerm.National Provider Identifier (NPI): The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 requires the adoption of a
standard unique identifier for health care providers.


The NPI Final Rule issued January 23, 2004 adopted the NPI as this standard. The NPI is a 10-digit, intelligence free numeric identifier (10 digit number).

Intelligence free means that the numbers do not carry information about health care  providers, such as the state in which they practice or their provider type or specialization.

The NPI will replace health care provider identifiers in use today in HIPAA standard transactions.

Those numbers include Medicare legacy IDs (UPIN, OSCAR, PIN, and National Supplier Clearinghouse or NSC).

The provider's NPI will not change and will remain with the provider regardless of job or location changes.

(See: NPI Registry)

Numbers_Oct 2010.jpg




EHR: ACCESS FOR ALL

| No Comments

EHR: ACCESS FOR ALL

| No Comments

DISRUPTIVE MOBILE APPS

| No Comments

DISRUPTIVE MOBILE APPS

| No Comments

GLOBAL AGING AND TECHNOLOGY

| No Comments

Facing global issues of aging and technology:

The technology of ages


GlobalAging_Oct 2010.jpg
























GLOBAL AGING AND TECHNOLOGY

| No Comments

Facing global issues of aging and technology:

The technology of ages


GlobalAging_Oct 2010.jpg
























mHEALTH LIVES

| No Comments

Talking about living . . .

mHealth Coming to Life

mHealth_Oct 2010.jpg


mHEALTH LIVES

| No Comments

Talking about living . . .

mHealth Coming to Life

mHealth_Oct 2010.jpg


HEALTH TERMS - SMART SENSOR

| No Comments

HEALTH TERM.jpgSmart Sensor

Definition:
A device that measures a signal or signals, processes data from the signal(s), and seamlessly integrates with wireless networks to transmit the data.

In health care, such sensors are used in real-time monitoring of a variety of parameters (movement, temperature, blood pressure, oxygen and glucose levels, heart rate, etc) and medication compliance.


Smart Sensors_Oct 2010.jpg


Enhanced by Zemanta

HEALTH TERMS - SMART SENSOR

| No Comments

HEALTH TERM.jpgSmart Sensor

Definition:
A device that measures a signal or signals, processes data from the signal(s), and seamlessly integrates with wireless networks to transmit the data.

In health care, such sensors are used in real-time monitoring of a variety of parameters (movement, temperature, blood pressure, oxygen and glucose levels, heart rate, etc) and medication compliance.


Smart Sensors_Oct 2010.jpg


Enhanced by Zemanta

HEALTH TABLET

| No Comments

HEALTH TABLET

| No Comments

HEALTH SPACES

| No Comments

HEALTH SPACES

| No Comments

REMINDER: NO DRVG - NO TXTG

| No Comments

REMINDER: NO DRVG - NO TXTG

| No Comments

WIRELESS MED

| No Comments

WIRELESS MED

| No Comments

HEALTH TERMS - WIRELESS HEALTH

| No Comments

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for HealthCareTerm.Wireless Health

Definition: The use of wireless technologies for personal health management and health care delivery.

Encompasses solutions that facilitate continuous access to health care information, expert advice, or therapeutic intervention enabled by ubiquitous telecommunication networks.

Example applications include real-time monitoring, medication compliance and imaging.

WirelessHealth_Oct 2010.jpg

HEALTH TERMS - WIRELESS HEALTH

| No Comments

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for HealthCareTerm.Wireless Health

Definition: The use of wireless technologies for personal health management and health care delivery.

Encompasses solutions that facilitate continuous access to health care information, expert advice, or therapeutic intervention enabled by ubiquitous telecommunication networks.

Example applications include real-time monitoring, medication compliance and imaging.

WirelessHealth_Oct 2010.jpg

Main Index