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Leroy Jones, Jr. is the creator of Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.

May 2010 Archives

MEMORIAL DAY 2010

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MEMORIAL DAY 2010

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TECH TERM - PROXY

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngProxy

Definition: A firewall mechanism that replaces the
Internet Protocol (IP) address of a host on the internal (protected) network with its own IP address for all traffic passing through it.

A software agent that acts on behalf of a user, typical proxies accept a connection from a user, make a decision as to whether or not the user or client IP address is permitted to use the proxy, perhaps does additional authentication, and then completes a connection on behalf of the user to a remote destination.




Proxy_May 2010.gif


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TECH TERM - PROXY

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngProxy

Definition: A firewall mechanism that replaces the
Internet Protocol (IP) address of a host on the internal (protected) network with its own IP address for all traffic passing through it.

A software agent that acts on behalf of a user, typical proxies accept a connection from a user, make a decision as to whether or not the user or client IP address is permitted to use the proxy, perhaps does additional authentication, and then completes a connection on behalf of the user to a remote destination.




Proxy_May 2010.gif


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SLEEP HELP

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SLEEP HELP

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EASY TELEMEDICINE

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Telemed_May 2010.jpg

Making telemedicine easier:

CMS proposes less burdensome telemedicine credentialing rules

The walls keep tumbling down!





EASY TELEMEDICINE

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Telemed_May 2010.jpg

Making telemedicine easier:

CMS proposes less burdensome telemedicine credentialing rules

The walls keep tumbling down!





MOBILE MENTAL HEALTH

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MobileMental_May 2010_1.JPGI learn something new everyday:

Is that a therapist in your pocket?


Who knew?

What do you think about this?


iPhone_May 2010.jpg





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MOBILE MENTAL HEALTH

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MobileMental_May 2010_1.JPGI learn something new everyday:

Is that a therapist in your pocket?


Who knew?

What do you think about this?


iPhone_May 2010.jpg





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PRIVACY WAVE

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PrivacyWave_May 2010.jpgIf this is the direction:

Good-Bye to Privacy?

What happens next?



More information at Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:

PRIVACY FACE





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PRIVACY WAVE

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PrivacyWave_May 2010.jpgIf this is the direction:

Good-Bye to Privacy?

What happens next?



More information at Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:

PRIVACY FACE





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TECH TERM - IP SPLICING

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngInternet Protocol (IP) Splicing

Definition: An action whereby an active, established, session is intercepted and co-opted by the unauthorized user.

IP splicing attacks may occur after an authentication has been made, permitting the attacker to assume the role of an already authorized user.

Primary protections against IP splicing rely on encryption at the session or network layer.



IPSplic_May 2010.jpg





TECH TERM - IP SPLICING

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngInternet Protocol (IP) Splicing

Definition: An action whereby an active, established, session is intercepted and co-opted by the unauthorized user.

IP splicing attacks may occur after an authentication has been made, permitting the attacker to assume the role of an already authorized user.

Primary protections against IP splicing rely on encryption at the session or network layer.



IPSplic_May 2010.jpg





TECH TERM - INTERNET PROTOCOL

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngInternet Protocol
   
Definition: The Internet Protocol (IP) is the method or protocol by which data is sent from one computer to another on the Internet. Each computer (known as a host) on the Internet has at least one IP address that uniquely identifies it from all other computers on the Internet.

When you send or receive data (for example, an e-mail note or a Web page), the message gets divided into little chunks called packets. Each of these packets contains both the sender's Internet address and the receiver's address.

Any packet is sent first to a gateway computer that understands a small part of the Internet.

The gateway computer reads the destination address and forwards the packet to an adjacent gateway that in turn reads the destination address and so forth across the Internet until one gateway recognizes the packet as belonging to a computer within its immediate neighborhood or domain.

That gateway then forwards the packet directly to the computer whose address is specified.

Because a message is divided into a number of packets, each packet can, if necessary, be sent by a different route across the Internet. Packets can arrive in a different order than the order they were sent in.

The Internet Protocol just delivers them. It's up to another protocol, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) to put them back in the right order.

IP is a connectionless protocol, which means that there is no continuing connection between the end points that are communicating.

Each packet that travels through the Internet is treated as an independent unit of data without any relation to any other unit of data. (The reason the packets do get put in the right order is because of TCP, the connection-oriented protocol that keeps track of the packet sequence in a message.)

In the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communication model, IP is in layer 3, the Networking Layer.

The most widely used version of IP today is Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4). However, IP Version 6 (IPv6) is also beginning to be supported. IPv6 provides for much longer addresses and therefore for the possibility of many more Internet users.

IPv6 includes the capabilities of IPv4 and any server that can support IPv6 packets can also support IPv4 packets.


IP_May 2010.jpg




























TECH TERM - INTERNET PROTOCOL

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngInternet Protocol
   
Definition: The Internet Protocol (IP) is the method or protocol by which data is sent from one computer to another on the Internet. Each computer (known as a host) on the Internet has at least one IP address that uniquely identifies it from all other computers on the Internet.

When you send or receive data (for example, an e-mail note or a Web page), the message gets divided into little chunks called packets. Each of these packets contains both the sender's Internet address and the receiver's address.

Any packet is sent first to a gateway computer that understands a small part of the Internet.

The gateway computer reads the destination address and forwards the packet to an adjacent gateway that in turn reads the destination address and so forth across the Internet until one gateway recognizes the packet as belonging to a computer within its immediate neighborhood or domain.

That gateway then forwards the packet directly to the computer whose address is specified.

Because a message is divided into a number of packets, each packet can, if necessary, be sent by a different route across the Internet. Packets can arrive in a different order than the order they were sent in.

The Internet Protocol just delivers them. It's up to another protocol, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) to put them back in the right order.

IP is a connectionless protocol, which means that there is no continuing connection between the end points that are communicating.

Each packet that travels through the Internet is treated as an independent unit of data without any relation to any other unit of data. (The reason the packets do get put in the right order is because of TCP, the connection-oriented protocol that keeps track of the packet sequence in a message.)

In the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communication model, IP is in layer 3, the Networking Layer.

The most widely used version of IP today is Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4). However, IP Version 6 (IPv6) is also beginning to be supported. IPv6 provides for much longer addresses and therefore for the possibility of many more Internet users.

IPv6 includes the capabilities of IPv4 and any server that can support IPv6 packets can also support IPv4 packets.


IP_May 2010.jpg




























AGE OF THE SMARTPHONE

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The future is now!!!
 

iPhone_May 2010.jpgSo how smart is your phone:

Smartphones Drive Handset Sales







AGE OF THE SMARTPHONE

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The future is now!!!
 

iPhone_May 2010.jpgSo how smart is your phone:

Smartphones Drive Handset Sales







PRIVACY FACE

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Facebook_April 2010.pngThe issue of privacy has hit Facebook right in the face!

Facebook meets the "Unlike" button

So is your privacy important to you???

Are your secrets safe?





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PRIVACY FACE

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Facebook_April 2010.pngThe issue of privacy has hit Facebook right in the face!

Facebook meets the "Unlike" button

So is your privacy important to you???

Are your secrets safe?





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CELLPHONE DATA

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Cell Data_May 2010.gifIs this your life?

Cellphones Now Used More for Data Than for Calls

Clearly the lines have shifted.

What's next?


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CELLPHONE DATA

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Cell Data_May 2010.gifIs this your life?

Cellphones Now Used More for Data Than for Calls

Clearly the lines have shifted.

What's next?


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MOBILE ONLY

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Mobile Phones_May 2010.jpg
The world keep changing . . .

More US Homes Going Mobile Only

Are you mobile only?




MOBILE ONLY

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Mobile Phones_May 2010.jpg
The world keep changing . . .

More US Homes Going Mobile Only

Are you mobile only?




NO CABLE TV

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Satellite_May 2010.jpg


This is one big joke right? . . .

Rogue satellite could kill cable programming



What's next?
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NO CABLE TV

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Satellite_May 2010.jpg


This is one big joke right? . . .

Rogue satellite could kill cable programming



What's next?
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"NEW SHOW - THE DECISION TREE"

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"TALKING TECHNOLOGY WITH
LEROY JONES, JR."

May 12, 2010

TOPIC: "NEW SHOW - THE DECISION TREE"

With:

TGoetz_April 2010.jpgThomas Goetz: The executive editor of Wired Magazine and author of The Decision Tree: Taking Control of Your Health in the New Era of Personalized Medicine.


Also check out: The Decision Tree Blog.







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"NEW SHOW - THE DECISION TREE"

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"TALKING TECHNOLOGY WITH
LEROY JONES, JR."

May 12, 2010

TOPIC: "NEW SHOW - THE DECISION TREE"

With:

TGoetz_April 2010.jpgThomas Goetz: The executive editor of Wired Magazine and author of The Decision Tree: Taking Control of Your Health in the New Era of Personalized Medicine.


Also check out: The Decision Tree Blog.







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NEW SHOW - "CHRONIC DISEASE & THE INTERNET"

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"TALKING TECHNOLOGY WITH
LEROY JONES, JR."

May 11, 2010

TOPIC:  "NEW SHOW -
CHRONIC DISEASE AND THE INTERNET"

With:



Thumbnail image for SusannahFox_Aug 2009.JPG
Susannah Fox
The Associate Director of Digital Strategy at the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, where she studies the cultural shifts taking place at the intersection of technology and health care.


The Pew Report:

"Chronic Disease and the Internet"




NEW SHOW - "CHRONIC DISEASE & THE INTERNET"

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"TALKING TECHNOLOGY WITH
LEROY JONES, JR."

May 11, 2010

TOPIC:  "NEW SHOW -
CHRONIC DISEASE AND THE INTERNET"

With:



Thumbnail image for SusannahFox_Aug 2009.JPG
Susannah Fox
The Associate Director of Digital Strategy at the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, where she studies the cultural shifts taking place at the intersection of technology and health care.


The Pew Report:

"Chronic Disease and the Internet"




Tech Terms - WiMAX

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngWiMax

Definition: Is a broadband wireless data communications technology based around the IEE 802.16 standard providing high speed data over a wide area.

The letters of WiMAX stand for Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (AXess), and it is a technology for point to multipoint wireless networking.

WiMAX technology is expected to meet the needs of a large variety of users from those in developed nations wanting to install a new high speed data network very cheaply without the cost and time required to install a wired network, to those in rural areas needing fast access where wired solutions may not be viable because of the distances and costs involved.

Additionally it is being used for mobile applications, proving high speed data to users on the move.

The standard for WiMAX is a standard for Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks (WMANs) that has been developed by working group number 16 of IEEE 802, specializing in point-to-multipoint broadband wireless access.

Initially 802.16a was developed and launched, but now it has been further refined. 802.16d or 802.16-2004 was released as a refined version of the 802.16a standard aimed at fixed applications.

Another version of the standard, 802.16e or 802.16-2005 was also released and aimed at the roaming and mobile markets.


WiMax_May 2010.jpg




Tech Terms - WiMAX

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngWiMax

Definition: Is a broadband wireless data communications technology based around the IEE 802.16 standard providing high speed data over a wide area.

The letters of WiMAX stand for Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (AXess), and it is a technology for point to multipoint wireless networking.

WiMAX technology is expected to meet the needs of a large variety of users from those in developed nations wanting to install a new high speed data network very cheaply without the cost and time required to install a wired network, to those in rural areas needing fast access where wired solutions may not be viable because of the distances and costs involved.

Additionally it is being used for mobile applications, proving high speed data to users on the move.

The standard for WiMAX is a standard for Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks (WMANs) that has been developed by working group number 16 of IEEE 802, specializing in point-to-multipoint broadband wireless access.

Initially 802.16a was developed and launched, but now it has been further refined. 802.16d or 802.16-2004 was released as a refined version of the 802.16a standard aimed at fixed applications.

Another version of the standard, 802.16e or 802.16-2005 was also released and aimed at the roaming and mobile markets.


WiMax_May 2010.jpg




FCC SPEAKS ON BROADBAND

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The position of the FCC on Broadband:





So now what?

FCC SPEAKS ON BROADBAND

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The position of the FCC on Broadband:





So now what?

BATTLE FOR THE 'NET

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The battle continues . . .


FCC plans to slap Net neutrality regs on broadband


What's next?

NetNeutrality_May 2010.JPG

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BATTLE FOR THE 'NET

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The battle continues . . .


FCC plans to slap Net neutrality regs on broadband


What's next?

NetNeutrality_May 2010.JPG

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BIONIC 2010

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Something to watch:

Bionic hand can bear 200-pound loads

When I hear Bionic . . .  I always think about:


6Million_May 2010.jpg
I guess this means I'm getting old!  :-)







BIONIC 2010

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Something to watch:

Bionic hand can bear 200-pound loads

When I hear Bionic . . .  I always think about:


6Million_May 2010.jpg
I guess this means I'm getting old!  :-)







HEALTH TERM - VITAL STATISTICS

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HEALTH TERM.jpg
Vital Statistics

Definition:
Statistics relating to births (natality), deaths (mortality), marriages, health, and disease (morbidity). Vital statistics for the United States are published by the National Center for Health Statistics.

Vital statistics can be obtained from Centers for Disease Control (CDC), state health departments, county health departments and other agencies.

An individual patient's vital statistics in a health care setting may also refer simply to blood pressure, temperature, height and weight, etc.

VitalStats_May 2010.jpg

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HEALTH TERM - VITAL STATISTICS

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HEALTH TERM.jpg
Vital Statistics

Definition:
Statistics relating to births (natality), deaths (mortality), marriages, health, and disease (morbidity). Vital statistics for the United States are published by the National Center for Health Statistics.

Vital statistics can be obtained from Centers for Disease Control (CDC), state health departments, county health departments and other agencies.

An individual patient's vital statistics in a health care setting may also refer simply to blood pressure, temperature, height and weight, etc.

VitalStats_May 2010.jpg

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iPHONE & IRON MAN 2

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It's almost time . . .

Marvel Brings "Iron Man 2" to the iPhone 


http://www.technicaljones.com/IRONMAN%201_Sept.%202008.JPG

Ya'll know I love SUPERHERO TECHNOLOGY!!!  :-)






We can't wait . . .   :-)


http://www.technicaljones.com/IRONMAN%202_Sept.%202008.JPG

My son is both Iron Man and Superman!



iPHONE & IRON MAN 2

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It's almost time . . .

Marvel Brings "Iron Man 2" to the iPhone 


http://www.technicaljones.com/IRONMAN%201_Sept.%202008.JPG

Ya'll know I love SUPERHERO TECHNOLOGY!!!  :-)






We can't wait . . .   :-)


http://www.technicaljones.com/IRONMAN%202_Sept.%202008.JPG

My son is both Iron Man and Superman!



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