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Leroy Jones, Jr. is the creator of Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.

April 2010 Archives

FACEBOOK vs. CONGRESS

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Facebook_April 2010.png
It seems that things are heating up in D.C.!!!
 
Here's some background on the comings & goings:


Facebook's impending fight with D.C. (FAQ)

Stay tuned!


USCapitol_April 2010.jpg


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FACEBOOK vs. CONGRESS

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Facebook_April 2010.png
It seems that things are heating up in D.C.!!!
 
Here's some background on the comings & goings:


Facebook's impending fight with D.C. (FAQ)

Stay tuned!


USCapitol_April 2010.jpg


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VIDEO DIET

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I've had some problems with my YouTube channel
this week . . .  I wonder if this was the cause of the problem.


You know people get real grumpy when they diet!  :-)


YouTube's player goes on a diet





Well . . . at least this one is working!!!  ;-)


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VIDEO DIET

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I've had some problems with my YouTube channel
this week . . .  I wonder if this was the cause of the problem.


You know people get real grumpy when they diet!  :-)


YouTube's player goes on a diet





Well . . . at least this one is working!!!  ;-)


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WIRED/PEW HEALTH DECISIONS EVENT - MY QUESTION

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More from the Pew/Wired Event . . .

Check out my question and the answer from:




Susannah Fox (The Associate Director of Digital Strategy at the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project)


Thomas Goetz: The executive editor of Wired Magazine and author of The Decision Tree: Taking Control of Your Health in the New Era of Personalized Medicine.

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WIRED/PEW HEALTH DECISIONS EVENT - MY QUESTION

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More from the Pew/Wired Event . . .

Check out my question and the answer from:




Susannah Fox (The Associate Director of Digital Strategy at the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project)


Thomas Goetz: The executive editor of Wired Magazine and author of The Decision Tree: Taking Control of Your Health in the New Era of Personalized Medicine.

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2010_1.JPG
Pew 
Wired_April 2010_2.JPG

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WIRED/PEW HEALTH DECISIONS EVENT

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I had the opportunity to attend this great event at the Pew Research Center on the role of health information in preventing chronic disease featuring:

http://www.technicaljones.com/assets_c/2009/08/SusannahFox_Aug%202009-thumb-450x675-thumb-300x450.jpg

Susannah Fox: The Associate Director of Digital Strategy at the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, where she studies the cultural shifts taking place at the intersection of technology and health care.


TGoetz_April 2010.jpgThomas Goetz: The executive editor of Wired Magazine and author of The Decision Tree: Taking Control of Your Health in the New Era of Personalized Medicine.




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WIRED/PEW HEALTH DECISIONS EVENT

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I had the opportunity to attend this great event at the Pew Research Center on the role of health information in preventing chronic disease featuring:

http://www.technicaljones.com/assets_c/2009/08/SusannahFox_Aug%202009-thumb-450x675-thumb-300x450.jpg

Susannah Fox: The Associate Director of Digital Strategy at the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, where she studies the cultural shifts taking place at the intersection of technology and health care.


TGoetz_April 2010.jpgThomas Goetz: The executive editor of Wired Magazine and author of The Decision Tree: Taking Control of Your Health in the New Era of Personalized Medicine.




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TECH/HEALTH TERM - FIREWALL

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http://www.technicaljones.com/TechTerm.pngFirewall


Definition: A computer connected both to the Internet and the local Hospital Information Network (HIN) that prevents the passing of Internet traffic, in the form of Internet Protocol (IP) packets, to the internal hospital network.  Provides an added layer of protection against "hackers."

There are two kinds of firewalls: external, which protect all hospital systems form the outside world, and internal, which protect only selected systems.

Firewall disadvantages: it restricts information transfer in both directions, and makes file transfer (ftp) and telnet (remote login) more difficult.

http://www.technicaljones.com/assets_c/2009/10/HEALTH%20TERM-thumb-117x117-thumb-117x117-thumb-117x117-thumb-117x117-thumb-117x117.jpg


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TECH/HEALTH TERM - FIREWALL

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http://www.technicaljones.com/TechTerm.pngFirewall


Definition: A computer connected both to the Internet and the local Hospital Information Network (HIN) that prevents the passing of Internet traffic, in the form of Internet Protocol (IP) packets, to the internal hospital network.  Provides an added layer of protection against "hackers."

There are two kinds of firewalls: external, which protect all hospital systems form the outside world, and internal, which protect only selected systems.

Firewall disadvantages: it restricts information transfer in both directions, and makes file transfer (ftp) and telnet (remote login) more difficult.

http://www.technicaljones.com/assets_c/2009/10/HEALTH%20TERM-thumb-117x117-thumb-117x117-thumb-117x117-thumb-117x117-thumb-117x117.jpg


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NEW SHOW - GOOGLE HACKERS

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"TALKING TECHNOLOGY WITH
LEROY JONES, JR."

April 23, 2010

TOPIC:  "GOOGLE HACKERS"


SCleland Pic_April 2010.jpgScott Cleland
Creator, The Precursor® Blog
President, Precursor® LLC
Chairman, NetCompetition.org®

Scott Cleland is a precursor, a prescient analyst with a long track record of industry firsts. Cleland is President of Precursor LLC, which consults for Fortune 500 clients; authors the "widely-read" PrecursorBlog.com; publishes GoogleMonitor.com; and serves as Chairman of NetCompetition.org, a pro-competition e-forum supported by broadband interests.

Eight different Congressional subcommittees have sought Cleland's expert testimony on a wide range of complex emerging issues related to competition; and Institutional Investor twice ranked him as the top independent telecom analyst in the U.S.

Cleland has been profiled in Fortune, National Journal, Barrons, WSJ's Smart Money, Investors Business Daily, and Washington Business Journal.


More information on Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


GOOGLE SECURITY




NEW SHOW - GOOGLE HACKERS

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"TALKING TECHNOLOGY WITH
LEROY JONES, JR."

April 23, 2010

TOPIC:  "GOOGLE HACKERS"


SCleland Pic_April 2010.jpgScott Cleland
Creator, The Precursor® Blog
President, Precursor® LLC
Chairman, NetCompetition.org®

Scott Cleland is a precursor, a prescient analyst with a long track record of industry firsts. Cleland is President of Precursor LLC, which consults for Fortune 500 clients; authors the "widely-read" PrecursorBlog.com; publishes GoogleMonitor.com; and serves as Chairman of NetCompetition.org, a pro-competition e-forum supported by broadband interests.

Eight different Congressional subcommittees have sought Cleland's expert testimony on a wide range of complex emerging issues related to competition; and Institutional Investor twice ranked him as the top independent telecom analyst in the U.S.

Cleland has been profiled in Fortune, National Journal, Barrons, WSJ's Smart Money, Investors Business Daily, and Washington Business Journal.


More information on Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


GOOGLE SECURITY




HAPPY EARTH DAY!!!

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HAPPY EARTH DAY!!!

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TECH TERM - COMPUTER HACKING

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Computer Hacking

Definition: Is the practice of modifying computer  hardware and software to accomplish a goal outside of the creator's original purpose. People who engage in computer  hacking activities are often called hackers.

Since the word "hack" has long been used to describe someone who is incompetent at his/her profession, some hackers claim this term is offensive and fails to give appropriate recognition to their skills.

It is most common among teenagers and young adults, although there are many older hackers as well. Many hackers are true technology buffs who enjoy learning more about how computers work and consider computer hacking an "art" form.

They often enjoy programming and have expert-level skills in one particular program. For these individuals, computer hacking is a real life application of their problem-solving skills. It's a chance to demonstrate their abilities, not an opportunity to harm others.

Since a large number of hackers are self-taught prodigies, some corporations actually employ computer hackers as part of their technical support staff.

These individuals use their skills to find flaws in the company's security system so that they can be repaired quickly. In many cases, this type of computer hacking helps prevent identity theft and other serious computer-related crimes.

Computer hacking can also lead to other constructive technological developments, since many of the skills developed from hacking apply to more mainstream pursuits.

For example, former hackers Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson went on to create the UNIX operating system in the 1970s. This system had a huge impact on the development of Linux, a free UNIX-like operating system. Shawn Fanning, the creator of Napster, is another hacker well known for his accomplishments outside of computer hacking.

In comparison to those who develop an interest in computer hacking out of simple intellectual curiosity, some hackers have less noble motives.

Hackers who are out to steal personal information, change a corporation's financial data, break security codes to gain unauthorized network access, or conduct other destructive activities are sometimes called "crackers."

This type of computer hacking can earn you a trip to a federal prison for up to 20 years.


ComputerHacker_April 2010.jpg








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TECH TERM - COMPUTER HACKING

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Computer Hacking

Definition: Is the practice of modifying computer  hardware and software to accomplish a goal outside of the creator's original purpose. People who engage in computer  hacking activities are often called hackers.

Since the word "hack" has long been used to describe someone who is incompetent at his/her profession, some hackers claim this term is offensive and fails to give appropriate recognition to their skills.

It is most common among teenagers and young adults, although there are many older hackers as well. Many hackers are true technology buffs who enjoy learning more about how computers work and consider computer hacking an "art" form.

They often enjoy programming and have expert-level skills in one particular program. For these individuals, computer hacking is a real life application of their problem-solving skills. It's a chance to demonstrate their abilities, not an opportunity to harm others.

Since a large number of hackers are self-taught prodigies, some corporations actually employ computer hackers as part of their technical support staff.

These individuals use their skills to find flaws in the company's security system so that they can be repaired quickly. In many cases, this type of computer hacking helps prevent identity theft and other serious computer-related crimes.

Computer hacking can also lead to other constructive technological developments, since many of the skills developed from hacking apply to more mainstream pursuits.

For example, former hackers Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson went on to create the UNIX operating system in the 1970s. This system had a huge impact on the development of Linux, a free UNIX-like operating system. Shawn Fanning, the creator of Napster, is another hacker well known for his accomplishments outside of computer hacking.

In comparison to those who develop an interest in computer hacking out of simple intellectual curiosity, some hackers have less noble motives.

Hackers who are out to steal personal information, change a corporation's financial data, break security codes to gain unauthorized network access, or conduct other destructive activities are sometimes called "crackers."

This type of computer hacking can earn you a trip to a federal prison for up to 20 years.


ComputerHacker_April 2010.jpg








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GOOGLE SECURITY

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Google Security_April 2010.jpg

Check this out:

Attack on Google said to hit password system

Gives you something else to think about.



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GOOGLE SECURITY

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Google Security_April 2010.jpg

Check this out:

Attack on Google said to hit password system

Gives you something else to think about.



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TWITTER ETERNITY

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LOC_April 2010.jpg


Twitter_April 2010.jpg


More information at Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


MAKING MONEY




TWITTER ETERNITY

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LOC_April 2010.jpg


Twitter_April 2010.jpg


More information at Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


MAKING MONEY




TECH TERM - AUTHENTICATION

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Authentication

Definition:
The process of determining whether the individual signing in under a specific user name actually has an account with permissions to perform specific actions.

Authentication can be as simple as providing a user name and password, but especially in high dollar e-commerce settings, authentication is usually done in conjunction with access across secure channels and sometimes alternative authentication mechanisms (from thumb prints to retinal scans).











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TECH TERM - AUTHENTICATION

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TechTerm_Image 2008.png
Authentication

Definition:
The process of determining whether the individual signing in under a specific user name actually has an account with permissions to perform specific actions.

Authentication can be as simple as providing a user name and password, but especially in high dollar e-commerce settings, authentication is usually done in conjunction with access across secure channels and sometimes alternative authentication mechanisms (from thumb prints to retinal scans).











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TAX TIME

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You still have time to file today either by mail or online:

Internal Revenue Service

Don't stress!  :-)


TaxTime_April 2010.jpg


TAX TIME

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You still have time to file today either by mail or online:

Internal Revenue Service

Don't stress!  :-)


TaxTime_April 2010.jpg


HEALTH DATA SECURITY

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Health Data Security_April 2010.jpg
So how secure are we?:




More information at Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


STATE OF DATA SECURITY




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HEALTH DATA SECURITY

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Health Data Security_April 2010.jpg
So how secure are we?:




More information at Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


STATE OF DATA SECURITY




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MAKING MONEY

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Social Revenue_April 2010.jpg


Is this the end of innocence?:






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MAKING MONEY

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Social Revenue_April 2010.jpg


Is this the end of innocence?:






Social Revenue_April 2010_2.jpg

SOCIAL ACADEMIC

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SOCIAL ACADEMIC

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FED TECH

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FED TECH

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VA - HEALTH IT

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VA - HEALTH IT

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TECH TERM - OPEN SOURCE

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TechTerm.pngOpen Source

Definition: Refers to a program in which the source code is available to the general public for use and/or modification from its original design free of charge, i.e., open.

Open source code is typically created as a collaborative effort in which programmers improve upon the code and share the changes within the community.

Open source sprouted in the technological community as a response to proprietary software owned by corporations.

A certification standard issued by the Open Source Initiative (OSI) that indicates that the source code of a computer program is made available free of charge to the general public.

The rationale for this movement is that a larger group of programmers not concerned with proprietary ownership or financial gain will produce a more useful and bug -free product for everyone to use.

The concept relies on peer review to find and eliminate bugs in the program code, a process which commercially developed and packaged programs do not utilize.

Programmers on the Internet read, redistribute and modify the source code, forcing an expedient evolution of the product.

The process of eliminating bugs and improving the software happens at a much quicker rate than through the traditional development channels of commercial software as the information is shared throughout the open source community and does not originate and channel through a corporation's research and development cogs.

OSI dictates that in order to be considered "OSI Certified" a product must meet the following criteria:

1.  The author or holder of the license of the source code cannot collect royalties on the distribution of the program

2.  The distributed program must make the source code accessible to the user

3.  The author must allow modifications and derivations of the work under the program's original name

4.  No person, group or field of endeavor can be denied access to the program

5.  The rights attached to the program must not depend on the program's being part of a particular software distribution

6.  The licensed software cannot place restrictions on other software that is distributed with it.



OpenSource_April 2010.jpg



TECH TERM - OPEN SOURCE

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TechTerm.pngOpen Source

Definition: Refers to a program in which the source code is available to the general public for use and/or modification from its original design free of charge, i.e., open.

Open source code is typically created as a collaborative effort in which programmers improve upon the code and share the changes within the community.

Open source sprouted in the technological community as a response to proprietary software owned by corporations.

A certification standard issued by the Open Source Initiative (OSI) that indicates that the source code of a computer program is made available free of charge to the general public.

The rationale for this movement is that a larger group of programmers not concerned with proprietary ownership or financial gain will produce a more useful and bug -free product for everyone to use.

The concept relies on peer review to find and eliminate bugs in the program code, a process which commercially developed and packaged programs do not utilize.

Programmers on the Internet read, redistribute and modify the source code, forcing an expedient evolution of the product.

The process of eliminating bugs and improving the software happens at a much quicker rate than through the traditional development channels of commercial software as the information is shared throughout the open source community and does not originate and channel through a corporation's research and development cogs.

OSI dictates that in order to be considered "OSI Certified" a product must meet the following criteria:

1.  The author or holder of the license of the source code cannot collect royalties on the distribution of the program

2.  The distributed program must make the source code accessible to the user

3.  The author must allow modifications and derivations of the work under the program's original name

4.  No person, group or field of endeavor can be denied access to the program

5.  The rights attached to the program must not depend on the program's being part of a particular software distribution

6.  The licensed software cannot place restrictions on other software that is distributed with it.



OpenSource_April 2010.jpg



ER TECH

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ER TECH

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WORLD AUTISM AWARENESS DAY

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World Autism_April 2010.jpg
Understanding . . .  Compassion . . .
Courage . . . and Love!


World Autism Awareness Day
is April 2, 2010




More information at
Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


LOVE & FAMILY


HEALTH TERM - AUTISM



Autism_Jan 2010.jpg





WORLD AUTISM AWARENESS DAY

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World Autism_April 2010.jpg
Understanding . . .  Compassion . . .
Courage . . . and Love!


World Autism Awareness Day
is April 2, 2010




More information at
Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


LOVE & FAMILY


HEALTH TERM - AUTISM



Autism_Jan 2010.jpg





iPAD HYPE

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The hype and excitement continues:

Apple's iPad Drawing Rave Reviews



iPad_April 2010.jpg


More information on the -
Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY TABLET





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iPAD HYPE

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The hype and excitement continues:

Apple's iPad Drawing Rave Reviews



iPad_April 2010.jpg


More information on the -
Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:


TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY TABLET





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